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MIT Keg Delivery Busted By State

By Tara L. Colon, CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Just weeks after the death of MIT first-year Scott Krueger, three under-age MIT students are facing alcohol-related charges stemming from the delivery of a keg of beer to the Zeta Psi fraternity house.

The keg was delivered on Friday afternoon by Blanchard's Liquors of Allston, according to the Massachusetts Executive Office of Consumer Affairs, which conducted the enforcement sweep on Friday.

The company's driver delivered the keg to the minors and took back seven empty kegs, the office alleges. The seven other kegs were tagged and are being traced.

Investigators from the state Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission (ABCC) witnessed the illegal delivery. The ABCC had had liquor stores with high delivery rates to college campuses under surveillance for more than a year.

The investigators also observed three other liquor stores on Friday afternoon, state investigators said. None of the other three stores was observed selling to minors.

Francis Godwin, one of the accused students, showed the driver an out-of-state license with an altered birth date Friday to obtain the keg, said Michael Duffy, head of the office of Consumer Affairs. But the license had the word "minor" stamped on it, he said.

Godwin, who is a first-year at MIT, will face charges of using a fake ID and possession and purchase of alcohol by a minor.

Repeated attempts to reach Godwin by The Crimson were unsuccessful.

Two other Zeta Psi members, whose names were not released, are also facing charges of possession of alcohol by a minor.

The ABCC referred the case to MIT police and to Middlesex District Attorney Thomas F. Reilly.

The owner and employees at Blanchard's are now facing criminal charges and the loss of their liquor license for selling and delivering to minors. The charges carry a maximum penalty of six months in jail and a $2,000 fine.

Blanchard's has suspended delivery pending the outcome of this investigation.

A manager at Blanchard's said yesterday, "We've been instructed not to comment."

MIT officials would not comment on what other charges or disciplinary actions may be taken against the students.

The ABCC complaints that will be filed include possession of a fake ID and underage purchase and possession of alcohol.

The fake ID charges carry a $200 fine and a maximum three-month jail sentence.

The purchase and possession charges carry fines of $300 and $50, respectively.

In addition to the eight kegs involved in the exchange, 17 empty kegs were found in the basement, and the Zeta Psi fraternity allegedly sold alcohol from its house, according to Duffy.

Kevin O'Connor, head of the MIT alumni corporation of Zeta Psi, denied in an interview that the fraternity had sold alcohol or charged admission fees at events where alcohol was served.

The fraternity and its members could face additional charges from the Inter-Fraternity Council, MIT's governing body for fraternities, sororities and independent living groups.

The Inter-Fraternity Council at MIT had issued a ban on drinking in fraternities after the death of Scott Krueger.

"The council's ban is specifically targeted at events, and this was not for an event," said Iddo Gilon, president of the Inter-Fraternity Council.

Gilon stressed that delivery of the alcohol to minors would violate state and local laws that "we are expected to uphold."

"We're probably going to suspend the fraternity pending the results of the official investigation," Gilon added.

And MIT officials continued to speak out, condemning underage drinking.

"We must redouble our efforts to educate our community about the risks and consequences involved in drinking," said Charles M. Vest president of MIT

Blanchard's has suspended delivery pending the outcome of this investigation.

A manager at Blanchard's said yesterday, "We've been instructed not to comment."

MIT officials would not comment on what other charges or disciplinary actions may be taken against the students.

The ABCC complaints that will be filed include possession of a fake ID and underage purchase and possession of alcohol.

The fake ID charges carry a $200 fine and a maximum three-month jail sentence.

The purchase and possession charges carry fines of $300 and $50, respectively.

In addition to the eight kegs involved in the exchange, 17 empty kegs were found in the basement, and the Zeta Psi fraternity allegedly sold alcohol from its house, according to Duffy.

Kevin O'Connor, head of the MIT alumni corporation of Zeta Psi, denied in an interview that the fraternity had sold alcohol or charged admission fees at events where alcohol was served.

The fraternity and its members could face additional charges from the Inter-Fraternity Council, MIT's governing body for fraternities, sororities and independent living groups.

The Inter-Fraternity Council at MIT had issued a ban on drinking in fraternities after the death of Scott Krueger.

"The council's ban is specifically targeted at events, and this was not for an event," said Iddo Gilon, president of the Inter-Fraternity Council.

Gilon stressed that delivery of the alcohol to minors would violate state and local laws that "we are expected to uphold."

"We're probably going to suspend the fraternity pending the results of the official investigation," Gilon added.

And MIT officials continued to speak out, condemning underage drinking.

"We must redouble our efforts to educate our community about the risks and consequences involved in drinking," said Charles M. Vest president of MIT

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