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Politicians Inaugurate New Belfer Center

* Symposium to discuss science, American security

By Jenny E. Heller, CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Prominent political figures and academics will discuss issues of American security today and tomorrow at the Inaugural Symposium of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (CSIA) at the Kennedy School of Government.

"The question that we posed is what are the most significant challenges to Americans' security and well-being in this quarter century," said Graham T. Allison Jr. '62, director of the Belfer Center. "We are fortunate to have a remarkable group of people coming."

Allison said the CSIA was re-endowed and refurbished last spring, when it changed its name. Paul M. Doty, Mallinckrodt professor of biochemistry emeritus, established the CSIA more than 20 years ago.

Vice President Al Gore '69 will deliver the keynote address at 3 p.m. today at the Forum. "He will speak on, loosely, international affairs," said Heather P. Campion, the Forum director.

Allison said administrators selected Gore to speak because he is an "active thinker" on academic questions, as well as a Harvard graduate.

Forum administrators selected 800 people by lottery to attend the speech--half of which are Harvard undergraduates and Kennedy School students.

At 5:30 p.m. Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.) and former Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) will speak at a panel discussion on the 1992 Nunn-Lugar legislation about nuclear arms in the former Soviet Union.

"This is the single most significant Congressional initiative in nuclear security," Allison said.

The legislation addresses the threat to American security posed by the break-up of the Soviet Union.

"The focus of Nunn-Lugar is simple: Do what it takes to reduce the spread of nuclear weapons expertise from the former Soviet Union to rogue states or terrorists," stated a report produced by Nunn's office.

Nunn-Lugar funds--at a cost of less than $400 million per year--have been used within the boundaries of the former Soviet Union.

The report said workers with the program have deactivated many nuclear armaments, stored weapons-grade uranium and plutonium out of the reach of "rogue" states, denuclearized three countries and employed many Soviet weapons scientists and engineers to discourage them from selling their expertise to terrorists or rogue states.

"A lot of the original thinking that gave rise to the legislation took place here at the Belfer Center," Allison said.

Allison said a report produced by academics at the Belfer Center stimulated Nunn and Lugar to propose the bill. As assistant secretary of defense, Allison actively worked on the program.

"This is the first evidence of new thinking in the post-Cold War," Allison said. "It's only a modest beginning."

He added, "The paradox in new nuclear theory is that it is Russia's weakness that is a greater threat than its strength."

Allison said comparing Russia's nuclear situation to China's raises some interesting issues. "China represents a whole other set of challenges," he said.

According to Allison, integrating China into the world stage is important for the future.

After the panel discussion, Sen. Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.) will speak about the new nuclear paradigm.

On Saturday, 300 guests, many former government officials, will discuss issues of international security, especially those concerning China. This issues will shape the research agenda for the Belfer Center this year.

Members of the Kennedy School faculty will chair the discussions

"A lot of the original thinking that gave rise to the legislation took place here at the Belfer Center," Allison said.

Allison said a report produced by academics at the Belfer Center stimulated Nunn and Lugar to propose the bill. As assistant secretary of defense, Allison actively worked on the program.

"This is the first evidence of new thinking in the post-Cold War," Allison said. "It's only a modest beginning."

He added, "The paradox in new nuclear theory is that it is Russia's weakness that is a greater threat than its strength."

Allison said comparing Russia's nuclear situation to China's raises some interesting issues. "China represents a whole other set of challenges," he said.

According to Allison, integrating China into the world stage is important for the future.

After the panel discussion, Sen. Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.) will speak about the new nuclear paradigm.

On Saturday, 300 guests, many former government officials, will discuss issues of international security, especially those concerning China. This issues will shape the research agenda for the Belfer Center this year.

Members of the Kennedy School faculty will chair the discussions

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