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Lighthouse Resumes Publication After Hiatus

After Semester-Long Interruption Caused by Money Woes, Magazine Reports Recovery

By Chana R. Schoenberger

Lighthouse Magazine, a "forum for the discussion of women's issues," published a March 1997 issue after near-bankruptcy caused the student group to halt production for a semester.

In last month's issue, the first since last semester's hiatus, Managing Editor Erin M. Bannister '98, who also serves as business manager, thanked several administrative offices and the Undergraduate Council for "generous contributions" to help the magazine resume publication.

In an article, Bannister attributed the quarterly magazine's troubles to $4,000 of accumulated debt as the "result of inexperienced business managers, disorganization in the magazine and irresponsible spending."

According to Sheila Warren '98, a two-year staff member, Lighthouse published a fall issue early last semester but did not produce a winter edition.

Bannister's article cites Radcliffe College, the Office for the Arts and the office of Dean of Students Archie C. Epps III, as well as the council, as sources of grants.

According to Steven E. Weinberg '99, the council's finance chair, the undergraduate government awarded Lighthouse a year-long grant for $1,200.

Weinberg said council grants to small campus publications usually total between three and six hundred dollars per semester.

"It's not out of line for a publication, but it's on the high side," Weinberg said. "We felt that their situation merited going onto the high side."

Weinberg said that Lighthouse's demonstrated commitment contributed to the council's decision to award the group a larger grant.

"In past years, because of their financial situation, we had given them lower grant awards because we felt that their finances were not in order," he said.

"We felt that they were making an extraordinary effort this year."

He credited the change to this year's management.

"Looking at Lighthouse's budgets from this year and last year, there was quite a change in how they do business," Weinberg said.

The returning issue of Lighthouse, which is in its seventh year of publication, featured the theme of "Women in Power" and included articles on women leaders on campus.

Articles also discussed Commencement speaker Madeleine K. Albright, the first woman to serve as Secretary of State

Weinberg said that Lighthouse's demonstrated commitment contributed to the council's decision to award the group a larger grant.

"In past years, because of their financial situation, we had given them lower grant awards because we felt that their finances were not in order," he said.

"We felt that they were making an extraordinary effort this year."

He credited the change to this year's management.

"Looking at Lighthouse's budgets from this year and last year, there was quite a change in how they do business," Weinberg said.

The returning issue of Lighthouse, which is in its seventh year of publication, featured the theme of "Women in Power" and included articles on women leaders on campus.

Articles also discussed Commencement speaker Madeleine K. Albright, the first woman to serve as Secretary of State

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