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Adams Crews Repair Burst Sewage Pipe

By Marc J. Ambinder, CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

The odor of sewage is now almost gone from the halls of Adams House, after crews on Saturday completed the repairs of a waste-water pipe that burst last week.

The sewage pipe running underneath the kitchen area had not been used during the summer due to the renovations to the Adams House dining hall, and during that time, a blockage developed in the pipes under the street near the house.

When students arrived this month and the water use in the building increased, the blockage moved to the intersection of the pipes going to the house and to the dining hall, according to Associate Director of Dining Services Leonard D. Condenzio. Construction workers rushed to fix the breach as soon as it was reported on Wednesday, he said.

That blockage sent a layer of sewage and other fluids into pipes in the crawl space underneath the kitchen area. When plumbers arrived to alleviate the blockage, "it was so far backed up...that some of the sewage came out," said Keith Pryor, a project manager for Barr and Barr Builders, the contractors who renovated the house's kitchen and serving area over the summer.

Condenzio said the pipe probably burst because of its age and because no water had run through it for nearly 10 weeks.

"It created a strain on the system because it's been out of service all summer," Condenzio said.

The smell emanating from the burst pipe was noticed by residents on all floors of the Adams B-entryway.

"It smelled the strongest in the tunnel going to the dining hall," said Adams resident Shirley Park '98.

"It was particularly noxious," said Edgar C. Gerwig, a teaching assistant in General Education who lives in B-entry-way.

Several house residents complained about the problem to Adams Superintendent Bill Wong, and those interviewed said they were happy with the House's prompt response.

Before the odor was eliminated, air conditioners were installed in several rooms in B entryway.

Wong refused to comment on whether any special consideration was given to students who complained

"It smelled the strongest in the tunnel going to the dining hall," said Adams resident Shirley Park '98.

"It was particularly noxious," said Edgar C. Gerwig, a teaching assistant in General Education who lives in B-entry-way.

Several house residents complained about the problem to Adams Superintendent Bill Wong, and those interviewed said they were happy with the House's prompt response.

Before the odor was eliminated, air conditioners were installed in several rooms in B entryway.

Wong refused to comment on whether any special consideration was given to students who complained

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