News

City Manager Talks Cambridge Emergency Shelter, Discourages Street Closures in Council Meeting

News

On Leave Due to COVID-19 Concerns, Forty-Three Harvard Dining Workers Risk Going Without Pay

News

Harvard Prohibits Non-Essential University Travel Until May 31, International Travel Cancelled Until August 31

News

Ivy League Will Not Allow Athletes to Compete as Grad Students Despite Shortened Spring Season

News

‘There’s No Playbook’: Massachusetts Political Campaigns Navigate a New Coronavirus Reality

Hundreds Of Students Use 'Fly-By' Lunches

By Alixandra E. Smith, CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Time-pressed undergraduates are flocking to Loker Commons in droves this semester to take advantage of Harvard Dining Services' newest option: the "Fly-By."

In just its second week of existence, the "Fly-By" bag lunch program is already being used by an average of more than 700 students a day.

"I come here most of the time," Lisa M. Card '01 said. "It's great--very convenient and still on the meal plan."

Ted Mayer, director of Dining Services, said that he was "extremely pleased" with the turnout. "It's great that so many students are utilizing this option," he said.

A component of the regular board program, the "Fly-By" option allows students to stuff their own lunch bag with five items from a selection of fruit, chips, desserts, drinks and sandwiches. After swiping their card, students can enjoy their meal in Loker or eat it on the go.

The "Fly-By" concept was first proposed last year during a meeting between Mayer and the Undergraduate Council's Dining Services task force, chaired by Noah Z. Seton '00 and John Paul Rollert '00.

"In discussing student dining concerns, the question of another option for student lunches kind of became our focus issue," Seton said.

"Students wanted more flexibility," Mayer said, noting that upperclass students who had a number of classes during the lunch hour had difficulty finding time to rush back to their houses. "It was a valid complaint and something we felt we could accommodate," he said.

Seton and Rollert worked closely with the dining staff through most of last year to find a solution. "It was totally a combined effort," Rollert said. "Mr. Mayer and his team helped us to create the 'Fly-By' proposal to present to the House Masters and subsequently became our main advocates with the faculty."

"We felt that a decent proportion of students would take advantage of it," Rollert added. "Especially for people from the Quad, or farther river houses, who now don't have to shell out money at the Greenhouse or in the Square."

Students are quick to praise the new Fly-By program, noting its flexibility and convenience.

"This is my third time using it," Daniel B. Horton '01 said. "It's really great--so much quicker and easier than trekking down to the river for lunch."

"I have classes from eleven to two, and my dining hall closes at two," Adams resident Benjamin D. Tolchin '01 said. "Now I can dash here at the end and get food."

Fatima DeRosa, a dining services staff member who works on the "Fly-By" line, said that students are excited about the program.

"They are lined up, waiting, when we open up. But the lines go quickly here, not like upstairs [at Annenberg]," she said.

Mayer predicts that the number of students who take advantage of the bag lunches will level off. "It's a good sandwich, but I think people will get tired of it. Plenty of students will still make the effort to go back to the Houses--there is a more relaxed atmosphere, more variety."

Rollert disagreed. "I think the number of students will increase. The program is still kind of new and not everybody knows about it yet, how convenient it can be."

If the students in line yesterday are any indication, the popularity of the "Fly-By" lunch option is more than just a passing fad. At2:10 p.m., five minutes before closing time, there was still a steady stream of hungry undergraduates. As DeRosa reached to return an ID card, the owner paused to ask, "Hey, are you guys open for dinner?

"In discussing student dining concerns, the question of another option for student lunches kind of became our focus issue," Seton said.

"Students wanted more flexibility," Mayer said, noting that upperclass students who had a number of classes during the lunch hour had difficulty finding time to rush back to their houses. "It was a valid complaint and something we felt we could accommodate," he said.

Seton and Rollert worked closely with the dining staff through most of last year to find a solution. "It was totally a combined effort," Rollert said. "Mr. Mayer and his team helped us to create the 'Fly-By' proposal to present to the House Masters and subsequently became our main advocates with the faculty."

"We felt that a decent proportion of students would take advantage of it," Rollert added. "Especially for people from the Quad, or farther river houses, who now don't have to shell out money at the Greenhouse or in the Square."

Students are quick to praise the new Fly-By program, noting its flexibility and convenience.

"This is my third time using it," Daniel B. Horton '01 said. "It's really great--so much quicker and easier than trekking down to the river for lunch."

"I have classes from eleven to two, and my dining hall closes at two," Adams resident Benjamin D. Tolchin '01 said. "Now I can dash here at the end and get food."

Fatima DeRosa, a dining services staff member who works on the "Fly-By" line, said that students are excited about the program.

"They are lined up, waiting, when we open up. But the lines go quickly here, not like upstairs [at Annenberg]," she said.

Mayer predicts that the number of students who take advantage of the bag lunches will level off. "It's a good sandwich, but I think people will get tired of it. Plenty of students will still make the effort to go back to the Houses--there is a more relaxed atmosphere, more variety."

Rollert disagreed. "I think the number of students will increase. The program is still kind of new and not everybody knows about it yet, how convenient it can be."

If the students in line yesterday are any indication, the popularity of the "Fly-By" lunch option is more than just a passing fad. At2:10 p.m., five minutes before closing time, there was still a steady stream of hungry undergraduates. As DeRosa reached to return an ID card, the owner paused to ask, "Hey, are you guys open for dinner?

Want to keep up with breaking news? Subscribe to our email newsletter.

Tags