The blog of The Harvard Crimson

How to Vibe Check Your Section

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{shortcode-eaf59255422f86c1e2a59186bd7526f5fcbef996}You’ve made it through shopping week — you lotteried, you registered. Now, it’s time for the most perilous part of the new semester: sectioning. Sure, you’ve gotten a read on your professor and the energy of lecture. But you can’t shop a section. Enter the “vibe check,” or the process of altering the vibes of a space through verbal or nonverbal signaling. Here’s how to vibe check your section.

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Set the Right Precedent with Your TF

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They’re probably a nice person. They have a life outside of section. And they also hold your grades in their hands. Give them a smile, listen to their backstory. If you can vibe with your TF, you’ll probably vibe with their section, and being nice is the best way to guarantee their support in your pursuit of good vibes. If they’re giving off bad vibes, consider switching sections.

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Chill Out

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This isn’t a job interview. Vibing is a mindful, peaceful experience, so leave the stress at the door. If you’re in a room with windows, sit somewhere with a view. If there are no windows, consider bringing your SAD lamp. Nothing says vibing like great lighting AND curing your seasonal affective disorder.

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Bring the Necessities

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Pen? Check. Paper? Check. Tea? Check. EcoSystems cup stuffed with cereal? Check. Section is like grabbing a meal, except you don’t have to talk about how busy and stressed you are. Set the precedent early. If you’re in a building with a café in it (Barker Center), take a little break and go get yourself a snack. Take your time. Vibing can’t be rushed.

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Section Kid

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This is where the real vibe check comes in. When they start to speak, first, remember they are your peer, they are worthy of respect, and you might be able to learn something from them. Then commence the vibe check. It could be verbal, by saying something like “while I respect your thoughts, I would appreciate some space for the words of others.” You could also just stare a foot over their head the entire time they’re talking. Vibe checked!

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Check the Whole Class

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When the room’s energy is off, and you simply can’t vibe, take direct action. If all else fails, wait for a lull, then stand up and loudly say “vibe check.” If everybody looks at you like you’re crazy, they’ve failed the vibe check. Consider sending them this article.

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It’s a new semester, it’s a new year. Ensure in 2020 that you’re surrounded with the best energy possible by vibe checking your way through your classes. And hey, if all else fails, at least you’ll still be vibing.

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Tag Yourself: Biology Concentrations as Harvard Celebrities

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{shortcode-03a40c4d130008d9713944dd4f131d2966d99a0e}Once upon a time, there was just one singular biology concentration at Harvard, much like at many universities in the country. But times have changed. With so many biologies to choose from, how do we keep track of them all? Using Harvard’s most notorious “celebs,” of course.

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Neuroscience (formerly Neurobiology): David Malan

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With the highest number of concentrators, Neurobiology is the CS50 of Harvard Biology. Neurobiology attracts students for its flexibility and applicability to disciplines from chemistry, psychology, and economics.

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Human Developmental and Regenerative Biology (HDRB): Larry Bacow

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The newest addition to the Harvard Biology concentration family, HDRB has quickly risen through the ranks when it comes to popularity.

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Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCB): Dean Rakesh Khurana

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Your classic, lovable, and dependable biology, MCB is the OG biology concentration. It’s also the second most popular, but HDRB might be giving MCB a run for its money.

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Integrative Biology (IB): Andrew Berry

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Not only is the vivacious Andrew Berry the Integrative Biology concentration adviser, he also embodies the philosophy of IB in allowing students to pursue any discipline that relates to biology: everything from physics to zoology to botany is fair game.

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Chemical and Physical Biology (CPB): Your Expos 20 Preceptor

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The chemistry and physics of biology (if that wasn’t already clear), so obviously it’s unnecessarily complicated – just like your 12-page final Expos paper. CPB is the smallest biology concentration at Harvard, so you’ll get to know your classmates very well as you slog through those extra math classes.

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Human Evolutionary Biology (HEB): Greg Mankiw

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For the econ snakes hiding amongst biology concentrators, waiting to reveal their true selves come recruiting season. Can anyone say behavioral econ?

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Fear not if you can’t find yourself among the biology concentrations; not everyone was meant to live and breathe Science Center Hall B.

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Quiz: Which Spring 2020 Class Describes Your Upcoming Semester?

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1. What’s your shopping week strategy?

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a. Already having all four of my classes picked out before Shopping Week even starts.

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b. Wandering around trying as many new classes as I can – I don’t want to miss out on finding one I might love!

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c. Finding all of my classes the night before (and hoping my.harvard isn’t down again...)

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d. Having 17 classes on my list, 15 of which are lotteries. Help.

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2. It’s the end of the semester and you just realized you haven’t used any BoardPlus! How do you spend it?

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a. Buying some sandwiches and healthy snacks to use for fuel while I study for finals.

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b. Grabbing all my closest friends and treating them to a night at one of the Grilles – anyone want cheese quesadillas?

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c. Buying six coffees a day until the semester ends, gotta stay awake somehow!

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d. Eating as many mozz sticks as my stomach can handle.

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3. How do you de-stress from classes?

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a. Usually journaling or exercising.

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b. Netflix and face masks with friends!

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c. Going out until 3 a.m.

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d. Do stress naps count?

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4. How’d you spend your winter break?

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a. Relaxing and preparing for the spring semester.

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b. Enjoying time with friends from my hometown.

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c. Sitting in my room on Twitter every night.

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d. Sleeping all day every day, then panicking the night before my flight because I haven’t packed at all.

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5. And finally… What’s your favorite springtime Harvard event?

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a. Housing Day.

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b. Does Valentine’s Day count?

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c. Yardfest!

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d. Last Day of Classes (please get me out of here)

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Results:

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Mostly A’s: EXPOS Studio 20 – The Successful Life

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Congrats – you’re going to have a great semester! You’ve built up some good habits, and you know what it takes to stay happy, healthy, and prepared. No matter where you find this success, stay humble and enjoy your semester.

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Mostly B’s: EXPOS 20 213 – Modern Love

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For you, this semester is all about finding love! Whether that’s in a relationship, a friendship, or some good ole self-love, this is a great opportunity to spend time with old friends or branch out and meet new people. Be open to new experiences and let your comfort zone grow!

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Mostly C’s: HIST 1018 – Coffee and the Nighttime: History and Politics, 1400-2020

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Looks like you’ll be having some late nights this semester… whether they’re spent in the library studying or in the Igloo “studying”, don’t forget to take the time to care for your own well-being too and get some sleep!

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Mostly D’s: TDM 121M – Introduction to Clown

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Whether your semester is good or bad, you can at least expect it to be hilarious! Enjoy the ride, and grab some friends to share some laughs with along the way. Your life may be like a sitcom this semester, but at least it’ll never be boring!

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Shopping Week Bingo

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From your blockmates to that kid in the library you always make awkward eye contact with, complaining about shopping week is the perfect way to start off any conversation. Check out how many of these harrowing shopping week experiences apply to you and see if you get Bingo!

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Which Harvard Student Over Winter Break Are You?

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{shortcode-60e62582769ffaf3a13a171d475928fdfe840063}For five weeks you’ve had the freedom to do whatever you want and gear up for the upcoming semester. Have you been chill, or have you been productive? There’s a good chance you fit one of the archetypes below…

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The Winternship Warrior

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Summer internships weren’t enough, and you just had to spend those transformative three weeks in NYC with an “externship” at a boutique bank. You’ve got some nice resume fillers to kick off the new year now, but are feeling a little burnt out from a lack of real relaxation.

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The Transformer

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Whether it be a new buff body or a radical change in style, you spent the break cooking up a new version of yourself, and now you’re ready to show the campus your evolution.

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The Big Lebowski

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Not many of these at Harvard, but if you are, you really kicked back for the month. Frequent hangouts with the lads and lots of Sour Patches have rendered you functionless for the upcoming semester.

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The Vacation Queen

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Fiji, Baja, Barbados, you name it. You’re international, and your Instagram collages let everyone know it. Expecting a throwback picture reminiscing the sun (or some thematic variation of it) in mid-February.

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The Hometown Hero

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Everyone still knows you because you’re the only kid in town who got into Harvard in the last 20 years. Whether you’re still visiting your ninth grade gym teacher or successfully organizing junior high friend reunions, it’s good to be home and special again.

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Flyby’s Back to School Playlist — Spring 2020

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{shortcode-a1d805b27b6749d84e1bd86f92e57bbffc7a432c}New Year, New Playlist! Listen to Flyby's take on the best bops of early 2020 and return to campus with good music, if not good vibes. From Harry Styles to Lauv, we’ve got your new music covered for when you’re trekking to class — or trying to remember what class is. Please listen responsibly.

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And with that, we present Flyby’s Back to Campus Playlist — Spring 2020.{shortcode-7d1dcab343e20c36e69f0bf9f41f958572315937}

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Like what you hear? Follow our Spotify account, where you’ll find all our playlists. Don’t like it? Tell us about it. Shoot a message to flyby@thecrimson.com, especially if you have ideas for more songs we can include.

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Your BoardPlus Horoscope Will Predict How Your Semester Will Go

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{shortcode-d70a5684dd2cb86ee3420f2715e843693300220d}Forget enneagrams and zodiacs: the real window to your soul lies in your BoardPlus preference. Whether you stockpile your semesterly $65 into one big end-of-the-year blowout or have to restrain yourself from making multiple trips to Lamcaf per day, the items that drain your balance reveal more about you than any personality test out there.

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Lamcaf Lattes

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Lamcaf is the sole redeeming quality of a marathon grind session in everyone’s favorite 24/7 undergraduate library. Skipping the chaos of the JFK Starbucks and saving your bank account from the strain of a Tatte habit make Lamcaf hard to pass up. If your BoardPlus lands in the hands of the godsends that staff the ’Caf, you’re probably a classic Harvard student: practical, motivated by the stress of approaching deadlines, and in dire need of a “treat yourself” day, like, everyday. You can expect a disgustingly full Gcal spread in the next week or two, but don’t worry — you always manage to tackle the grind. Ramp up your self-care routine (maybe switch out your standard drink for something sweet, like a chocolate croissant) and you’ll ride out this semester just fine.

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Mozz Sticks

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Mozz Sticks are practically the unofficial mascot of Harvard. Any weekend without a late night Grille order of golden, cheesy happiness is for all intents and purposes considered a loss. Burning BoardPlus on mozz sticks is a surefire indicator that you’re out to do damage over the weekend to makeup for your weekly workloads. While you’re out, you may have some messy late-night encounters, so be ready for the possibility of awkward dhall/section eye contact, or perhaps even a mention on Harvard Confessions. Keep the same confidence you use while going out to avoid letting the cringey memories get to you, and you should be set.

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Barker Cafe Bougieness

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Crimson Yard’s sun-soaked neighbor is everyone’s favorite escape from campus, minus the whole effort/time/money that it takes to actually escape campus. If you’re spotted in Barker more days of the week than not, it’s safe to say that you appreciate aesthetics and won’t hesitate to drop some dollars on treating yourself. A last-minute end of the semester trip is in your future, likely New York. Embrace the spur-of-the-moment vibe, but be ready to get hit by everything you put on pause when you get back. At least you’ll have a fresh stock of photos for the inevitable “take me back :(“ pics that you’ll be posting during finals!

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Buckminster’s Lindt Truffles

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If you’re a regular at the LISE building’s cafe, chances are you’re a STEM kid seeking refuge from the Science Center, a Music Department student in need of a pick-me-up in between practices, or just someone who spends entirely too much time wandering around campus in search of food. The hidden gem of BoardPlus cafes, Buckminster’s keeps a rotation of non-standard fare.

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Another semester, another $65 blank slate. Use it wisely!

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Flyby Explores: Thrifting Near Campus

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{shortcode-ef2ed44bef76718ad271c004b5ea7d327d7b4d25}For some, the coming semester is a chance to bounce back from spending last semester wearing the same sweats five days in a row. If you already spent all your money on caffeine during finals, shopping on Newbury Street may not be financially feasible. Or maybe the thought of dropping a grand on a Goose terrifies you, and you’re looking for other ways to keep warm. Whether you’re need to reinvent yourself after a finals season crisis or want to sell your summer pieces for some cash, Boston’s thrift and consignment stores are a great option.

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Goodwill

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There are six Goodwill stores in the Boston area, but only three that Harvard students will realistically make the trek to: 520 Massachusetts Ave. in Central Square, 965 Commonwealth Ave. in Allston, and 230 Elm St in Davis Square. Of the three, the Central Square location is the closest, while the Davis Square location is more promising for upscale finds. One reviewer described the Davis Square store as the “baby bear” of Boston thrift shops by providing a “just-right” amount of options. Everything is organized by color, a quality sure to please Type A personalities. Furthermore, Goodwill is a nonprofit, so donating clothing is perfect for those of you who want to do some good before fully committing to selling out.

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Oona’s

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Oona’s provides a vast selection of true vintage pieces with most items dating back to before the ‘90s. The boutique provides clothing that is out of the box but still appropriate for everyday wear. Aside from being a great place to find a genuine ’40s little black dress or ’70s bell bottoms, the store boasts an expansive men’s section for those of you who are tired of wearing your Department of Harvard Athletics sweatshirt every day. If you’re still missing the presence of Urban Outfitters in the Square, there is also a hipster apothecary section. Most importantly: All pieces come dry-cleaned!

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Raspberry Beret

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If you are a dedicated hypebeast and can’t give up your labels, Raspberry Beret is a consignment boutique that carries many major brands. The Maynard location caters to a more preppy crowd with brands like Lululemon and Kate Spade. For those who wish to be more adventurous with their fashion, the Cambridge location carries brands like Marimekko, John Fluevog, and Free People, as well as a larger vintage collection. If you are wary about purchasing second-hand, reviewers say that the clothes and shoes here are usually barely worn and often still have the tags on them.

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All of these stores are great options to refresh your wardrobe or just provide a bit of retail therapy. And remember, thrifting is good for the planet, not just for your wallet!

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Ellen and Christine Gain the Freshman 15 in 15 Hours: A Definitive Review of Ice Cream in Harvard Square

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{shortcode-eb7fe099e23cf3272dbf2a3d5fa849b693b37294}Even though the temperature is below freezing, there has never been a better time for ice cream. We evaluated four frozen dessert locations around Harvard Square based on flavor, texture, size, and importantly, price. To even the playing field, we sampled each location’s most popular flavor, ranging from classics like cookie dough to newcomers like blueberry cheesecake. Check out our reviews below!

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J.P. Licks

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Flavors: Cookies and Cream, Pumpkin Cheesecake

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JP Licks never disappoints in terms of flavor — its crown jewel, the Cookies and Cream, is thick and rife with Oreo crumbles, packing a flavorful punch. The Pumpkin Cheesecake is a unique take on a classic dessert, with a subtle cheesecake flavor. But if you’re considering JP Licks for a mid-study session pick-me-up, beware: its prices are laughably exorbitant for the portions you get. Nonetheless, it is and always will be a Square staple and a “treat yo’ self” destination.

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Ben & Jerry’s

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Flavor: Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough

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{shortcode-88387a7800b1534a2c0a6128c7441771c9e3c98b}Ben & Jerry’s is known to many as a grocery store classic, given their colorful pints and outrageous flavors. Making the trek to the Ben & Jerry’s in the Garage, we were surprised to hear that their most popular flavor is Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough. While the texture was smooth, there was an uneven distribution of dough and chip, leaving us wishing we had stuck to the pre-packaged pints instead. However, the generous portions ensure you at least get that bang for your buck.

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Berryline

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Flavor: Original with Mochi and Oreo Cheesecake Toppings

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{shortcode-4fa6659acb3170ea9216eb1ea19353c8e457de55}After a filling meal of sweet potato fries from the dhall, Berryline is the place to hit up for a sweet and semi-healthy treat. We tried the Original flavor, which comes with a tart yet incredibly creamy texture that acts as a blank canvas for the toppings of your dreams. We chose mochi, a chewy and subtly sweet topping that would make any Trader Joe’s fan swoon. Unfortunately, the oreo cheesecake we chose had an overwhelming cookie crust and didn’t quite deliver on its cheesecake promises. At only $4 for a relatively large portion, though, Berryline is the perfect way for you to convince yourself that it’s okay that you slept through that exercise class at the MAC — and sample some yummy toppings as well.

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Amorino

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Flavors: Blueberry Cheesecake, Pistachio, L’Inimitable

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{shortcode-827a5e99ae3a071dd72f4922ca309edc77d9ea94}If this was Buzzfeed’s Worth It, Amorino would have three dollar signs and there would be classical music playing in the background. The decadent gelato flavors actually lived up to their names, from the rich creaminess of the Blueberry Cheesecake to the luscious Nutella-esque L’Inimitable. With each bite tasting deliciously expensive, our broke college student palates found the portions to be far too small and the cost too high for our liking. On the bright side, a few scoops would certainly make for a fantastic post-exam treat or dessert date destination!

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HUDS Froyo

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Flavors: Vanilla, Mango, Dulce de Leche, Chocolate, etc.

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The HUDS froyo machine is the layman’s favorite source of dessert when the Square is too far and funds are running low. With alternating flavors each week, the frozen yogurt in the dhalls is a surprisingly solid choice to round out your meal. Dulce de Leche is a known fan-favorite, and if you manage to grab a cone on the same night that the brownie bar is out, you have easy access to a variety of toppings. The best part? It’s free!

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With exam season looming on the horizon, everyone on this campus deserves some sort of frozen treat. We hope this guide helps you find both your dessert of choice and your sanity just in time for finals!

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A Chat with Raymond Quitumba Jr., a Harvard Shuttle Driver

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{shortcode-57f4c56053b7d24f7916841a2685769a27bd21a1}Have you ever had the urge to take the shuttle around campus and talk with the people who get a glimpse into the very best and worst of Harvard student life? We know that life gets real on the shuttle, so we caught up with Raymond Quitumba Jr., a Harvard shuttle driver. We’ve always wanted to get the inside scoop from those who are the literal movers and shakers of Harvard.

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How long have you been driving the Harvard Shuttle?

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I have been driving for 16 years. And I love driving. It’s my passion.

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Do you have a favorite day of driving?

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The weekends. The reason why is because I see the Harvard students going out together, going to different events. There are a lot of activities going on at the Quad, and I see a lot of students when they are a little bit drunk, easygoing. I have a lot of opportunities to interact with them on weekends, so I think [those] are the busiest days when I like to drive the shuttle.

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Have you had any crazy experiences?

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Crazy experiences as a bus driver … When I see some students randomly trying to stop the bus in the middle of the road. That is dangerous. It is not safe. Our priority here is the safety of the students. Safety is the key issue for us as Harvard bus drivers.

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What has been your worst experience on the shuttle?

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Worst experience is when there is a snow storm, where there are a lot of snow banks, particularly on DeWolfe street which is my route on Mather B. And during the snowstorm you face a lot of challenges because you have to swing through cars to get to the bus stop.

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What’s your favorite route?

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My favorite route to drive is the Allston. I started doing Allston before, and then I shifted to doing Mather. The reason I like Allston is because I get to deal with the grad students. The attitude of the grad students is different than undergrad students. Grad students are more easygoing, very straightforward. A lot of times the undergrads are busy and don’t want to be bothered.

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What’s been the most fun experience?

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When I see parents [and] they come with the kids on the shuttle, and I see how the kids like to ask questions regarding how we are doing driving the shuttles, and sometimes we see parents greeting us with so much passion and are so grateful for what we are providing for their children — this gives me a good feeling.

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It’s easy to get caught up in busy Harvard life, but next time you board the shuttle, be sure to thank your driver!

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Pets of Harvard: Piper the Cat

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{shortcode-c19d02b5d5e8bac31f03cfa70682acf64a5794b6}If you knock on the right door in Wigglesworth H Entryway, you just might be greeted by entryway proctor Kasey Hamel ’14 and her colorpoint cat Piper. Piper is a ragdoll cat, a variety known to go limp when you pick them up and hold them in your arms, almost like a newborn baby. Hamel, a proctor and physician assistant by profession, simply adores Piper, and says, “I would describe our relationship as perfect.”

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Although Hamel grew up in a pet-friendly home — her family had three dogs and two cats at one point — she recalls her sometimes lonely years as a College student, as she missed the feeling of a dog or cat in her lap. She consequently vowed to get a cat after graduation. Kasey Hamel and her husband Tom Hamel ’14 got Piper from a breeder a couple of years ago. "It was the best day of my life," she smiles. Piper’s birthday is Cinco de Mayo, and she is now two years old.

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{shortcode-e61732de56bea4961c79e956d9dc35702cf57b69}While Piper may be adorable, she can still get into trouble. When she was a young kitten, Piper jumped into the toilet, very much by accident. “She had this thing that she liked to sit on top of the toilet while I would shower,” Hamel explains. One day, the seat was left up, and Piper leapt up to her normal perch only to get drenched in toilet water. “I had to pick her up and hold her up like Simba in the shower to wash her off,” Hamel laughs, recalling how shocked the two of them were at the ungodly hour of 6 a.m. on a workday.

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“Piper is the love of my life,” confesses Hamel. "When I'm home, we are always together. She loves to cuddle up on my chest and purr, she's always following me around.” However, Piper has a slightly more playful relationship with Tom. “She's always bugging him and stealing his seat,” Hamel laughs. Piper also devotedly waits next to the door for him to come home every night. She often tries to take chicken off their plates if Kasey and Tom decide to eat on the couch.

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{shortcode-abdbbbbc98b84e67fe17e3c2e108aac71eb4615d}Piper’s favorite toys are her fish taco squeaky and a laser pointer. Piper is a fairly social cat, though she is more of a home-body and thus doesn’t have too many pet friends. One of her close friends is Basil the guinea pig who lived in Weld until last semester with a former proctor. At one point, Hamel babysat Basil, and while it took a little bit of time for the two pets to warm up to one another, Piper was sad when Basil went home. “I was keeping Basil in the bathroom, and when I got home from work Piper would be outside the bathroom ready to go say hi to Basil, and she did that for a few days after Basil left,” Hamel recounts.

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Next time you walk down Massachusetts Avenue, take a glance Yardside to catch a small ragdoll cat people-watching on the busy street. "I also think she's a big JP Lick's fan,” Hamel quips. Alternatively, keep an eye out for Piper sitting in the kitchen window of her Wigglesworth H room, overlooking the Yard. Indeed, one day another proctor noticed Piper meowing amicably at tourists, who were talking back at her and took pictures of her. “I like to think there's some tourist blog that she's famous on somewhere, like the Cat of Harvard Yard," Hamel laughs.

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{shortcode-8fd05f179cb250e3b22fd0ddb610ae60ab8e2070}Despite self-admittedly having more 2000 photos of Piper on her smartphone — a “‘cat’alogue”, so to speak — Hamel has no plans of starting an Instagram account for Piper as “she's too special to release publicly.” Holding office hours, however, is not off the table. "I mean, for the students, yes. If there are some true cat fans out there, I could not deprive them of Piper,” Hamel says.

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Piper is, by no means whatsoever, Kasey’s pet peeve. "Everything about her is perfect. She's a model cat: easy, breezy and beautiful."

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Click here to head back to the Pets of Harvard homepage!

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Pets of Harvard: Jerry

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{shortcode-3b076e1f94c3d688b5118a130a5a0699021c33f3}Sometimes, visitors to the west side of the Science Center’s fourth floor are greeted not by the Biology offices or Statistics help sessions they came looking for, but by a shrill series of yaps — compliments of a very small and energetic dog named Jerry. Jerry, a nine-year-old Chihuahua, comes to the Science Center a few days a week with Life Sciences 1b: “An Integrated Introduction to the Life Sciences: Genetics, Genomics, and Evolution” preceptor Annie S. Park.

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Park says that when she adopted him seven years ago, Jerry was several pounds heavier than his current weight, a nontrivial difference since Jerry is already so light. According to Park, Jerry didn’t have much of a neck or waist and resembled a “fat sausage.” Losing a few pounds since then has helped Jerry get to a healthier weight for his legs and joints to support. Good for you, Jerry!

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{shortcode-158e7cebdedadf22d522555da2f41572dc7b1486}Park loves that meeting or even walking past Jerry “brings out the side of people you normally don’t get to see,” like when he’s able to elicit high-pitched “awwww”s from tall, powerful-looking athletes. Jerry is small enough that people passing by often don’t see him until they get pretty close, so suddenly noticing him is always an exciting surprise.

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Jerry can get nervous around strangers, but on the whole absolutely loves attention. In particular, he enjoys groups of “adoring fans.” If Park lets him out at the front of the lecture hall before class, students will come up to meet him, which Jerry thinks is “the best thing ever.”

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“He likes prancing and playing with his toy,” Park says. “It’s really funny to watch.”

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{shortcode-d7b1e4b31286925c26edae3abaefe07729516e62}Toys, of course, are an important part of Jerry’s life. He’s never without one, meaning that if Park doesn’t bring one for him, he’ll find something like a stick, fall in love with it, and take it home with him. Jerry isn’t picky about toys at all, and similarly, he’s very willing to try new foods. He enjoys fruits, carrots, and other typical dog-friendly human foods, and will “eat anything, honestly,” including odd foods like cilantro.

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Park also said Jerry has made progress with his socialization over the years.

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“When I got him he was extremely unfriendly, extremely unsocialized. And so, like, the first time I took him outside, he was like, ‘Oh my gosh,’ and would not walk.”

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{shortcode-58b782ccd5a1be08cd7da78840e70700f6a4a426}Jerry has come a long way, Park said. He can still get shy or even territorial around strangers, but opens up and is good at remembering people.

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“He has a really big personality at home when he's comfortable,” she said. “It makes me sad that not everyone can see that side of him where he's just, like, rolling around in bed. Like, you know, this crazy little guy.”

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Jerry is still learning to get along with other dogs, but Park proudly reports that he has made one dog friend, a small Maltese that he plays with.

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One of her favorite things about Jerry is that he “always gives, like, 110 percent to everything he does,” Park says. “He's that guy that like, really tries as hard as he can at everything. So if he's like, ‘I need to drink water,’ he will go drink water and drink water as hard as he can.”

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{shortcode-20848e7e0d39c636b751534d185158cadcbb6969}When Flyby met Jerry, he was stylishly dressed in a green striped sweater. He looked so good that it was shocking to learn that he hates outfits and will run away when Park holds one up to put on. The outfits are necessary for Jerry to “be happy and still play outdoors.” He loses heat so easily that even 75 degree weather can be chilly for him. According to Park, one of Jerry’s best looks is an outfit made of fluffy sherpa material, which has bear ears attached to the hood.

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Park would like to get a Halloween costume for Jerry, but has struggled in the past with finding costumes small enough for him. Given her choice of well-fitting costumes, she thinks Jerry would be excellent in a spider costume where the extra legs flopped around every time he runs.

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You can follow Jerry on Instagram @jerrythetinypooch.

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Pets of Harvard: Tiki

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{shortcode-c5def5c9f1713e8cf12f13996074ccf38f5ff4fd}Kirkland House is famous for its furry residents, and Tiki, the absurdly cute, eight-month-old service dog of Nikki Daurio ’20, is no exception. After seriously contemplating suicide last year, Daurio took a year off from Harvard, and this year she says she can “see how much healthier I am.” Daurio credits herself for getting healthy through her treatment, but says that Tiki has been invaluable to her. Daurio says of Tiki, “Harvard is a completely different place with her. I don’t understand how I went through three years at Harvard without her.”

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Daurio got Tiki from a goldendoodle service dog breeder, Cali Pals Service Dogs. For the first two months of her life, Tiki was exposed to all sorts of environments, including a construction site at seven weeks old. She then completed a month of non-service dog obedience training before Daurio got her in May. The pair continued working on obedience training until Tiki was four months old, after which they underwent service dog training at Orange County Service Dogs three times a week.

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{shortcode-b56b2e4ceadc7428474e376b230e9a5b73ea1426}Daurio and Tiki trained for around six hours a day all summer using a variety of methods. Daurio says that it’s hard because “you’re treating this dog as medical equipment” and yet “they’re also a puppy.” She says that service dogs “still have off days. We continue our training every day.”

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Tiki was almost named Waves, as Daurio feels a deep connection to the ocean. By the time Daurio got her, Tiki had already been trained to respond to her given name, Kiki. Daurio decided to keep the same sound, and named her Tiki for its association with the tiki torch in “Survivor” and its relation to the beach.

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Daurio is impressed by the dual roles of service dogs, noting “On and off-vest, it’s like two different dogs. When she has her vest on, she knows she’s working.” However, when the vest come off, “she likes to remind me that she’s a puppy.” Even with all of her skill and training, Tiki hasn’t mastered drinking water without submerging her entire face. “That’s why she has a permanent mustache,” laughs Daurio.

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{shortcode-89fa9ca3d6568b0e066d83a9203b88d7704e82d4}So what’s the difference between service dogs and emotional support animals? Daurio explains that essentially, “there are three main categories: a therapy dog, emotional support animal, and service dog.” While service dogs have specific tasks they are trained to perform to help one individual with a disability, neither emotional support or therapy dogs are task trained. “Therapy dogs are meant for many people,” Daurio says. Like service dogs, “emotional support animals are meant for one person, however, they are not task-trained.” Only service dogs have public-access rights, but emotional support animals can fly and live in no-pets buildings.

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Tiki has three tasks: deep pressure therapy, interrupting signs of self-harming behavior, and providing a brace to help Daurio if she needs help getting up or feels like she’s going to pass out. To ensure that she is fully capable of doing her job while she is working, Tiki needs clear boundaries on what behavior is and is not acceptable. For example, she is only allowed to play with dogs in a designated space at designated times. Tiki won’t be considered fully trained until two years old, and even then the training will continue.

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{image id=1341518 size=medium align=right caption=false" byline=true}When asked about what it’s like living with a service dog, especially as a student, Daurio admits, “It’s not a privilege to have a service dog. It’s really annoying.” She says “if I didn’t need a service dog, I would love to not have a dog with me everywhere I go.” But Daurio can’t speak highly enough of Tiki. “She works so hard. That’s another thing that’s hard about having a dog at school: They work so hard that it’s hard to correct bad behavior when they’re off-duty.”

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As for how people should treat service dogs in public, Daurio says, “don’t stare at them. If they’re putting effort and energy into not paying attention to you, that takes away from them doing their job.” While dogs are cute and it’s easy to get excited every time you see one, Daurio says, “I hope that people reading this article, when they see a service dog in public, they just ignore it.”

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{shortcode-0a3e42c990b26c1fa45fdb3bf1723db8a27b3230}There are two moments that Daurio points to that stick out of her memories with Tiki. The first is when, at five months old, Tiki was “incredible” at Disneyland. “It showed me that I can live a life with a service dog, and she’s amazing. I love her so much.” The second is “the first time she tasked without me training it, I was crying, and she jumped up and interrupted. And in that moment I was like, this is my dog. This is my service dog, and we’re gonna be together forever.”

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Pets of Harvard: Piper The Dog

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{shortcode-00b8ecd02515586fd60b34a6f9f436146e5ccb2b}For most of her life, Pforzheimer House Faculty Dean Professor Anne Harrington had only had rescue dogs in her household. So when her then-10-year-old son Ben insisted that “the only thing he wanted in the world was a dog,'' Harrington's first reaction was to Google rescue centers. “She came from Tennessee with a whole bunch of other dogs in an 18-wheeler, and we ended up picking her up in a parking lot in Connecticut,” Harrington recalls. “It was around Christmas time, and so the guy who was bringing up all the dogs had put on a Santa Claus hat.” Though the other dogs were on leashes, he had to carry Piper in his arms and give her over directly to Harrington and her son because the puppy was so small.

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In addition to being a happy moment for the family, Piper’s arrival was also celebrated by students and tutors. “I had sent a notice out to the Pfoho students that we were arriving with a puppy, and there was a whole crowd of students waiting,” Harrington remembers. “She was this adorable little puppy and her first introduction to life here was being surrounded by a big crowd of students who really missed their pets.”

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{shortcode-d6780cce4f575349c49c86906d73bc94b913f897}Piper, who is half-Labrador and half a mystery breed, made her debut on the silver screen just three months after she was adopted as the star of the 2015 Quad-wide Housing Day Quadweiser video. Inspired by the popular Budweiser Lost Dog Super Bowl advertisement, Young Piper accidentally boards the Quad shuttle and gets stranded along the River where she is rescued from the menacing Mather lion by all the Quad mascots. Professor Harrington described the experience as fun. “You have a 3-4 month old puppy and you're trying to get them to listen to stage commands,” she laughed. “That year, she was kind of a celebrity. We brought her down to the Yard for Housing Day and people said, oh, that's the puppy!”

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Though Piper is “primarily a family dog,” Harrington stressed that Piper has an important place in the Pfoho community. Indeed, many students have dog therapy time with her, some even taking Piper up to their dorms for company while studying. Piper also has her own page on the House website. “I know when I've gone into the weight room there's a sign somebody put up with Piper looking straight at you saying, ‘Piper says put your weights back on the shelves where they belong’,” Harrington recalls. One of Harrington’s favorite aspects about Piper is that “she's not exclusive; she has room in her heart to care about students.”

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Unfortunately, Piper is currently recovering from a slight injury she got from chasing a rabbit on the Quad lawn, and thus cannot swim, race the other Quad dogs, or take early morning walks in Raymond Park as she usually does. However, Piper’s naughty side includes begging for food. “She has unfortunately developed the habit of looking incredibly adorably wistful and insisting that she's starving to death,” Harrington laments. “She won't steal, but she will pretend to look pathetic.”

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{shortcode-b076c15cab603c063539f6e192ec8e585c1d3149}Piper is currently five years old, and is very much a New England dog despite being born in Tennessee. She loves the snow, and Harrington adds that “she's also a real water dog. One of her favorite things to do is to go over to Fresh Pond, which is about 3/4 of a mile from here, and that’s a pond dogs are allowed to swim in. She'd spend hours there if we'd let her.”

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Harrington can’t pinpoint a favorite memory she has of Piper, but instead smiles at her dog for a moment as Piper wrestles with her favorite toy, a stuffed log with hidden chipmunks, before picking, “Seeing her in the water. She adores it and she's so happy. She actually really smiles, and you can tell when she's happy. Those are happy memories.”

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Pets of Harvard: Bailey

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{shortcode-23e7cf5cef95782cf75a022ca131bb5e66910986}If you’ve ever visited the Leverett Towers and witnessed a lovable brown dog racing across the courtyard, you’ve probably seen Bailey, a sweet Belgian Malinois owned by a resident tutor in Leverett G Tower, Victoria M. Martin.

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Originally from a breeder in Atlanta, Bailey was given to Martin as a birthday present 10 years ago. Since then, Bailey has grown from a small puppy to the fully grown dog she is today, and has also grown to be a part of the Martin family. When Martin moved to Cambridge three years ago, she brought Bailey with her. According to Martin, Belgian Malinois like Bailey are a unique breed possessing both high intelligence and remarkable emotional flexibility, meaning they can switch between work and play modes easily. In fact, Martin says that Belgian Malinois are commonly used in police forces, airports, and even the military.

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{shortcode-f2f91186e2494f43036ce3a28d1c7817ff326a15}While Bailey may not be working a nine-to-five job like some Belgian Malinois, she certainly keeps herself busy between chasing bunnies in the courtyard, interacting with students, and watching out for the newest addition to the Martin family. Martin and her husband, also a resident tutor in Leverett G Tower, recently had a baby. Martin said that lately, Bailey, “will come and get us if the baby is crying. If she doesn’t think we’re responding quick enough, she’ll run in and look at us.” This is Bailey’s way of demonstrating how much she loves her new sibling. Though Martin said she was initially worried Bailey would have trouble “figuring out what to make of the baby,” it seems the two are on their way to being great friends. While Bailey is well-trained and can do all the standard tricks, like fetch and ball play, Martin said Bailey’s attention to the new baby is “her best new trick.” It certainly speaks to how strong of an emotional bond dogs are able to form.

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Outside her duties as a baby watcher, Bailey loves to swim. One of Martin’s favorite memories with Bailey on family trips are the visits to her parents at their home on Cape Cod.

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“She loves to swim. She’s perpetually launching herself into the ocean after a ball, and then swimming back until she’s so tired she could drown, but would still never stop. It’s her happy place.”

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{shortcode-e9c0f565ad1cd78c7c8b8e2d951ac2a08a4305b6}Though her favorite place might be the salty waters, Bailey loves being part of the Leverett House community. As a friendly, people-oriented dog, she adjusted well to the transition from living in a suburban neighborhood to living in a dorm with students. The only minor hiccup was that before coming to Harvard, Bailey became accustomed to barking when someone came to the door.

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At the time, Martin said this “was not very annoying, but actually a desirable skill to have.” Moving to Leverett changed that for the Martins. “Now, where we live, students will knock at our door more frequently, or 30 students will come for a study break. We’re trying to teach her that she doesn’t need to bark when every student enters our room,” said Martin, “That’s probably the hardest thing, we haven’t quite mastered it yet.”

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Pets of Harvard: Beam

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{shortcode-d6afdb55260b12e2ea244cd912101e9d4ddb6ba3}Tucked away off of Plympton St. lies Randolph Courtyard, a favorite spot among Adams residents and all members of the Harvard community both for its prime Carpe-hosting capabilities and sweet scenery. If you hang around the courtyard long enough, you might just be lucky enough to see the normally peaceful space disrupted by a certain boisterous German Shepard named Beam. Flyby sat down with Beam’s human, Adams House resident tutor William Burke, to get the details on the dog that brings the courtyard to life.

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Beam hails from Scranton, Pa., where she lived with her nine other brothers and sisters before joining Burke in Cambridge. When Burke first encountered Beam, he found what one might expect from a litter of puppies meeting a stranger: lots of playing, tumbling, barking, and general excitedness from the bunch — except for Beam, who was snoozing happily in a corner. Also unlike her siblings, Beam was the only pup with long hair, despite both her parents being shorthaired dogs.

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“I guess there’s always a non-zero chance,” Burke says of Beam’s unique hair, laughing. “She was, like, the weirdo of the litter.”

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Still, Burke thought that this sweet little “weirdo” would be a perfect fit for life on campus, and took her home.

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From there, they faced perhaps the biggest dilemma of any pet owner: what to name their new companion. Of course, there were some basic criteria to guide their choice. Burke wanted to choose a name related to architecture. It also had to be a single syllable “so that it would be easy to shout,” Burke notes. In the end, Beam won out over their other top choices, “Roof” and “Eave.” However, don’t be fooled. The German Shepard’s full registered name isn’t just beam, but rather “Simply Supported Honeymoon Beam.”.

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{shortcode-484025b0c6219eb78763920b9805b3bf4242bc02}In her two years at Harvard, Beam has become a staple of the Adams House community. “Every hour is puppy office hours!” Burke laughs, looking over at Beam, who is deep in a game of chase with her pal and fellow Randolph canine, Opie. Beam is also a big fan of outdoor yoga, which is one of the programs Burke runs for students as a Wellness Tutor. Beam’s presence, however, may not exactly be conducive to tapping into a zen state, as she loves to lick students’ faces as they stretch. Energetic yoga interruptions aside, Burke maintains that Beam is an extremely good-natured dog.

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“She grew up around 470 college students since she got here, she’s never known anything else. You could set off fireworks, or thunder, nothing fazes her. She just lies on the couch. She might, like, lift an eyebrow,” Burke said.

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Beam certainly is not a small dog, but she genuinely enjoys living in a dorm. Burke chalks it up to the fact that dogs “like having a den,” and says that she actually got into the routine of living at Adams so quickly that they stopped crate training her a few months early. Despite her love of her cozy home with the Burkes, there’s rarely a day when you can’t spot Beam outside, rain or shine. So, keep your eyes peeled if you’re anywhere near Adams, and maybe even consider rerouting your walk to cut through the Randolph courtyard — you might just see Adams House’s very own German Shepherd!

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