Contributing writer

Jane Z. Li

Latest Content


Julius Z. R. Wade

Despite having no artistic experience before college, Wade has participated in more than 30 shows at Harvard as an actor, director, producer, and stage manager — “the whole nine yards,” he says.


The Rising Cost of Nighttime Care

In order to avoid another significant bill, Jordan opted to Uber off-campus to Mount Auburn Hospital, accompanied by her roommate. She received a taxi voucher from UHS for her trip back to campus, but when it failed to summon a taxi for “three to four hours,” she ended up returning to campus around 7 a.m. with HUPD.


To Make a Dumpling

It’s the summer before my freshman year of college, and my mom is trying to teach me as many recipes as she can before I leave for school. One day, she approaches me — she wants me to make dumplings from scratch, all on my own. While I’m usually enthusiastic about cooking together, that day I balk.


All Roads Lead to Fluff

The “What the Fluff” festival, jointly organized by Union Square Main Streets and the Somerville Arts Council, celebrates the creation of marshmallow fluff, which turns 102 this year.


Sleep 101 and Sleep Matters Initiative Promote Healthy Sleep Patterns

Programs like the Sleep 101 training module and the Sleep Matters Initiative are sparking conversations about issues of sleep and wellness at Harvard, and shedding light on why researchers believe sleep should be prioritized on college campuses.


The Neighborhood Where Nothing Ever Changes

Should Bill Bartley have to leave the neighborhood, he will take a piece of its history with him. Yet his departure would be but one of many, part of a long, gradual erosion of the landmarks that have distinguished Harvard Square for many years. And as the face of the Square changes, small business owners have no choice but to confront a version of the neighborhood’s future that may no longer save space for them.


The Neighborhood Where Nothing Ever Changes

Should Bill Bartley have to leave the neighborhood, he will take a piece of its history with him. Yet his departure would be but one of many, part of a long, gradual erosion of the landmarks that have distinguished Harvard Square for many years. And as the face of the Square changes, small business owners have no choice but to confront a version of the neighborhood’s future that may no longer save space for them.