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Mr. Freeman was surprised at the resemblance between England and America, whereupon some of the English journals remarked that English ideas had been slowly spreading in the United States, at least in New England, and others said that, on the contrary, England was becoming Americanized - or, to use a synonymous term, going to the dogs. We have noticed one similarity of late that seems to favor the latter view. When, on the evening of the late State election in Massachusetts, large crowds were assembled in Boston in front of the screens on which the latest returns were cast by the lime-light lanterns, as each successive bulletin gave a larger majority for Butler, among the other cries, we are told, there were shouts of "Bad for Harvard!" Compare this with the comment of the Spectator on Lord Carnarvon's statement that "three-fourths of the literary power of the country and four-fifths of the intellectual ability" were on the Conservative side, and the answer by a writer in the Times giving a long list of eminent liberals. The Spectator says, "Neither assertion nor rejoinder matters a straw. The transfer of power, under our modern system, is not left to professors, but to those whom they scarcely influence at all." - [N. Y. Post.

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