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NLRB Moves to Reverse Rule Deeming Graduate Students Employees

Bargainfest

The National Labor Relations Board proposed a rule Friday that would essentially reverse a 2016 decision that opened the door for students at private universities and colleges — including Harvard — to unionize.

Eyes Wide Shut

San Diego Staves Off Late Harvard Push as Football Drops Opener, 31-23

Spectators were left wondering if they truly were reliving the same quarter over and over again – or if Sinnett was just that damn good. In the end, Sinnett and the Toreros proved just good enough, staving off a late Harvard comeback attempt to take home a 31-23 victory.

Harvard Office of the General Counsel to Review Epstein Donations

Mass Hall at Night

Harvard’s Office of the General Counsel will conduct a review of billionaire donor and convicted sex offender Jeffrey E. Epstein’s donations to the University, Vice President and General Counsel Diane E. Lopez announced in an email to Harvard affiliates Friday afternoon.

Harvard Democrats Back Student Groups for Presidential Candidates

Harvard Student Groups Back Political Campaigns

As the Democratic primary race heats up across the country, various groups supporting individual campaigns have begun to crop up on campus, each seeking to differentiate the candidates from the wide field and gain supporters.

45 Students Win Seats on Undergraduate Council

UC first meeting Smith Center

Forty-five students were elected to the Undergraduate Council in the highest-turnout election in recent years, the UC Election Commission announced Friday. This year’s election saw 2,149 voters, a significant increase from the 1,885 ballots cast in 2018 and 1,454 votes in 2017.

Responding to a ‘Crisis in the Humanities,’ Harvard History Dept. Rebrands

Robinson Hall

Most notably, this fall the department rolled out a new series of “foundations” courses geared toward freshmen and students outside the concentration, including those attempting to fulfill the General Education program’s new Social Sciences distributional requirement.

Ahead of Climate Strike, A Look at Harvard Corporation Members’ Ties to the Fossil Fuel Industry

Loeb House

Several members of the Harvard Corporation — the University’s highest governing body — have maintained financial and professional ties to the fossil fuel industry through their employment or company investments.

San Diego Staves Off Late Harvard Push as Football Drops Opener, 31-23

Spectators were left wondering if they truly were reliving the same quarter over and over again – or if Sinnett was just that damn good. In the end, Sinnett and the Toreros proved just good enough, staving off a late Harvard comeback attempt to take home a 31-23 victory.

45 Students Win Seats on Undergraduate Council

UC first meeting Smith Center

Forty-five students were elected to the Undergraduate Council in the highest-turnout election in recent years, the UC Election Commission announced Friday. This year’s election saw 2,149 voters, a significant increase from the 1,885 ballots cast in 2018 and 1,454 votes in 2017.

Responding to a ‘Crisis in the Humanities,’ Harvard History Dept. Rebrands

Robinson Hall

Most notably, this fall the department rolled out a new series of “foundations” courses geared toward freshmen and students outside the concentration, including those attempting to fulfill the General Education program’s new Social Sciences distributional requirement.

Harvard Graduate School Presidents Discuss Union Cooperation, Addressing Disparities Across Schools

The meeting also covered diversity and inclusion grievance processes, lactation room standardization, and transportation to the new Allston campus.

Rhode Island Man Pleads Guilty to Threatening Prof. Believed to Be Affiliated With Harvard

The man — 29-year-old Matthew Haviland of North Kingston, R.I. — also sent threats to a school in Massachusetts reported to be one of Harvard’s professional schools.

OPINION

White House
Editorials

Donation Nation

Instead of just donating money to candidates, donate your time, your principles, your expertise — your dedication to upholding the democracy.

Op-Eds

It’s Not (Yet) Too Late for Harvard to Lead

We call on the Harvard Corporation, and, importantly, the Harvard Management Company, to display similar vision and commitment, and to take seriously the abundant and mounting evidence in favor of fossil fuel divestment.

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FM

Professor Pull-Ups 1

Working Out With Professor Pull-ups

Sandel hopes to continue combining his interest in philosophy with his interests in both law and fitness. “I try to take lessons that I would learn in the gym and apply them to life more generally,” he says. “Your goal is an event in its own right; pour everything you have into that and don’t look at the finish line. That is something you learn from training for these pull up competitions.”

Ignobel Awards Speaker
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ARTS

'Ad Astra' still

‘Ad Astra’ Reaches the Stars

A magnetic performance from Brad Pitt and gorgeous cinematography from Hoyte van Hoytema propel "Ad Astra" into the stratosphere of space epics.

'The Goldfinch' still

‘The Goldfinch’: A Lukewarm Take on a Classic

While the film is too messy to spark much award-season buzz and too plot-heavy to please the book’s readers, “The Goldfinch” still manages to be an earnest film.

The Nickel Boys Cover

‘The Nickel Boys’ is Both a Shattering and Deeply Necessary Read

“The Nickel Boys” starts out hopeful in a way that signals that things will go wrong very quickly.

SPORTS

Football

Preview: Football Antsy to Play, Opens Season at San Diego

Harvard football waited 44 weeks to start playing again and it's finally time. Sporting a new team, an old quarterback, and an antsy captain, the Crimson will fly across the country to challenge a formidable San Diego on enemy turf.

Women's Golf

Women's Golf Victorious At Dartmouth Invitational

The Harvard women’s golf team looked on as the men’s team dominated the field at the Ryan T. Lee Memorial to open the season. One week later, the women teed off at the Dartmouth Invitational to start their own campaign. The result: even more Crimson dominance.

Features

Harvard Baseball’s Complex Racial History: William Clarence Matthews and the Southern Road Trips

Former Harvard president Charles Eliot once said, “This year I'm told the team did well because one pitcher had a fine curveball. I understand that a curve ball is thrown with a deliberate attempt to deceive. Surely this is not an ability we should want to foster at Harvard.” While Eliot’s understanding of off-speed pitches may have missed the strike zone, he was correct to highlight that the baseball team during his tenure had a skewed moral compass. For some players on the team, the curves off the field proved more troublesome than those on the diamond.

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