Shelter Skelter

Councilor Quinton Y. Zondervan points out that an end to the pandemic could come with a surge in homelessness, as the eviction moratorium expires. “There’s going to be a wave of evictions, of people who couldn’t afford to pay their rent. It’s a horrible disaster waiting to happen,” he says. “[It will] disproportionately impact Black and Brown community members ... We can’t go back to normal,” he adds. “We have to [do] better, because normal was unjust.”

Four Stories, Four Harvard Workers

In the wake of Harvard reducing idled workers' pay to 70 percent during the pandemic, we followed four Harvard employees over the course of three months, conducting interviews on a weekly basis. These four individuals shared their lives with us, and although financial challenges and the pandemic have touched each of them, the pay cut is far from the only reason why these stories need telling.

A Diversified Debauchery

Final clubs were made for white men. Now, people of color — who were never supposed to step through their gates at all — are carving out communities inside them. They’re drinking their alcohol and smoking their cigars. They’re reveling in these spaces, instrumentalizing the white men’s mansions for pure fun.




Midfielder Lara Schenk Finds Ways to Train Among the Best Despite Pandemic

One year ago, as Harvard students were forced to vacate campus, junior midfielder Lara Schenk (#18) of the women’s soccer team moved back home to Hannover, Germany. A Tuesday, March 10, 2020, email had announced that students would be required to vacate the campus by that Sunday, and the NCAA and all major sports would soon follow suit with shutdowns of their own.

In Photos: A Tour of the New Science and Engineering Complex

Though most students, faculty, and staff do not yet have access to Harvard’s new Science and Engineering Complex due to Covid-19 restrictions, The Crimson was granted access to tour the eight-story SEC Monday. Here is a brief look, in photos, of the SEC’s features, study spaces, and classrooms students can look forward to.

Harvard Juniors Harris and Omotowa Named 2021 Truman Scholars

Araoluwa P. Omotowa ’22 and Undergraduate Council President Noah A. Harris ’22 were selected for their “outstanding leadership potential” and their record of public service. The scholarship entitles them to up to $30,000 in funding for post-graduate studies as well as special opportunities for government employment, per the scholarship’s website.

A ‘Fundamental’ Shift: Harvard Institute of Politics Marred by Tensions, Turnover as Kennedy School Asserts Increased Control

Previously unreported documents obtained by The Crimson reveal how concerns over the governance, performance, and leadership of Harvard’s storied Institute of Politics have come to a head in recent years.




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From Our Bookshelves: 'Dear Mr. Henshaw'

Beverly Cleary's 1983 novel, "Dear Mr. Henshaw" is strikingly relatable to the post-pandemic reader as it details a life gripped by loneliness and isolation.

The Harvard College Podcast Network: A New Hub of Creative Student Voices

HCPN seeks to make podcasting accessible to all individuals, emphasizing that anyone can be a podcaster.

‘Crimson Peak’ Retrospective: Del Toro’s Hallmark Fantasy Comes to Netflix

Ultimately, “Crimson Peak” is working within a distinct genre: a contemporary fairy tale told through a horror lens, with equal parts Gothic melodrama and gruesome violence.

The Converging Pasts of Leslie Epstein

Leslie Epstein spoke with The Harvard Crimson about his latest project, "Hill of Beans" a novel situated in Epstein's own familial history of 1940s Hollywood.


Midfielder Lara Schenk Finds Ways to Train Among the Best Despite Pandemic

One year ago, as Harvard students were forced to vacate campus, junior midfielder Lara Schenk (#18) of the women’s soccer team moved back home to Hannover, Germany. A Tuesday, March 10, 2020, email had announced that students would be required to vacate the campus by that Sunday, and the NCAA and all major sports would soon follow suit with shutdowns of their own.

The Quarantine Crunch: Crouin Keeps His Eye on the Ball

Like many student-athletes at Harvard junior Victor Crouin had his world turned upside down when students were sent home in March due to the coronavirus pandemic. The star first seed on the Crimson’s elite squash squad managed to return to his hometown of Marseille, France, just before the nation went into lockdown.

In Canada and Separated from Teammates, Noah Kirkwood Works to Stay Connected

He led the team in scoring 10 times and in assists 13 times during his sophomore campaign. Hoping to continue his impressive career, Kirkwood has been struggling to find adequate resources for training and playing basketball during the pandemic.

Around the Ivies: One Last Time

Maybe it’s just the graduation goggles, but I realized that I don’t need football to do one of my favorite things as a Crimson reporter: write my Around the Ivies column. Although it may be harder to berate the Brown football program — don’t worry, I still will — the Ancient Eight is still alive even without sports. So without further ado, let’s take one last trip Around the Ivies.


From Our Bookshelves: 'Dear Mr. Henshaw'

Beverly Cleary's 1983 novel, "Dear Mr. Henshaw" is strikingly relatable to the post-pandemic reader as it details a life gripped by loneliness and isolation.

The Harvard College Podcast Network: A New Hub of Creative Student Voices

HCPN seeks to make podcasting accessible to all individuals, emphasizing that anyone can be a podcaster.

‘Crimson Peak’ Retrospective: Del Toro’s Hallmark Fantasy Comes to Netflix

Ultimately, “Crimson Peak” is working within a distinct genre: a contemporary fairy tale told through a horror lens, with equal parts Gothic melodrama and gruesome violence.

The Converging Pasts of Leslie Epstein

Leslie Epstein spoke with The Harvard Crimson about his latest project, "Hill of Beans" a novel situated in Epstein's own familial history of 1940s Hollywood.


Midfielder Lara Schenk Finds Ways to Train Among the Best Despite Pandemic

One year ago, as Harvard students were forced to vacate campus, junior midfielder Lara Schenk (#18) of the women’s soccer team moved back home to Hannover, Germany. A Tuesday, March 10, 2020, email had announced that students would be required to vacate the campus by that Sunday, and the NCAA and all major sports would soon follow suit with shutdowns of their own.

The Quarantine Crunch: Crouin Keeps His Eye on the Ball

Like many student-athletes at Harvard junior Victor Crouin had his world turned upside down when students were sent home in March due to the coronavirus pandemic. The star first seed on the Crimson’s elite squash squad managed to return to his hometown of Marseille, France, just before the nation went into lockdown.

In Canada and Separated from Teammates, Noah Kirkwood Works to Stay Connected

He led the team in scoring 10 times and in assists 13 times during his sophomore campaign. Hoping to continue his impressive career, Kirkwood has been struggling to find adequate resources for training and playing basketball during the pandemic.

Around the Ivies: One Last Time

Maybe it’s just the graduation goggles, but I realized that I don’t need football to do one of my favorite things as a Crimson reporter: write my Around the Ivies column. Although it may be harder to berate the Brown football program — don’t worry, I still will — the Ancient Eight is still alive even without sports. So without further ado, let’s take one last trip Around the Ivies.