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To the Record-Breaking Class of 2025

But despite our emphasis on the numbers, these accepted students are far from just statistics — they are our future classmates, neighbors, and friends who will come to define post-Zoom Harvard. They are the students who we will welcome into our communities next Housing Day and who will, a year later, welcome an entirely new class themselves. We are excited to discover their passions and talents, quirks and idiosyncrasies, and to see them explore and bring to life our little Cambridge corner. To the newly admitted Class of 2025, welcome to Harvard — we are so happy to have you.

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“Okay” and “Not Okay”: The Destructive Binary of Mental Health

Perhaps, as a world, and at institutions such as this university, if the majority of people stopped considering themselves to be completely different than the minority of people with recognized mental disorders, there would be a reduction in exclusionary behavior and an increase in the empathy that reducing this stigma so desperately requires. At the same time, dismantling this binary might convince the “okay” majority to not feel as though their mental health problems are insignificant, encouraging them to seek support.

If You Want Change, You Want Voter Turnout

We need to cultivate a culture that shows people their vote matters at every level, and these policies would definitely help achieve that goal. No matter if it’s for the president or a city council member, every vote matters. Once we can collectively accept this reality, the country will truly improve.

Don’t Covid-Shame

Instead of spending so much time and attention (ineffectively) attempting to embarrass rule-breakers into good behavior, we should ask for more from our government officials in regards to vaccine distribution, Covid guidelines, and financial support. We must stop taking cheap shots at anti-maskers and turn to those who are responsible for the current situation and are actually in a position to affect change. Moving towards real progress means moving past Covid shaming for our own benefit.

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Editorials

By The Crimson Editorial Board

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Roll Up Your Sleeves, But Choose Where With Care

We urge our peers and Cambridge neighbors in pursuit of vaccinations to carefully research the communities that they are entering; to vigilantly consider whose vaccine slots they may be taking up; and, most profoundly, to be mindful in their actions, understanding that vaccine retrieval — while broadly beneficial — can have countervailing effects if not pursued responsibly.

Harvard Needs Democracy Days

Harvard, which prides itself as the place where America’s future leaders are created, should allow its affiliates to tangibly partake in democracy without having to balance University-related obligations for one, crucial day. Engaging in civic and community action is important, and breaking from the Harvard bubble to serve communities in Cambridge and Boston is valuable. The Democracy Day proposal, which students have put thought and labor into crafting, facilitates both. All Harvard has to do is say yes.

Somehow, Harvard’s Legacy of Slavery Initiative Neglects KKK Chapter

Our university’s history is more than top-notch research, billionaire dropouts, and obscenely wealthy donors. The terror endured by Black students at Harvard —  the emotional scars Harvard Klansmen and their flaming cross made — shouldn’t be forgotten. Its inclusion within our broader historical record might be embarrassing or disturbing, and rightly so. But it will also offer a fuller, more truthful account of what campus was truly like; one that allows students to place themselves within a nuanced and expansive continuum. A true history of our complex past — including the good, the bad, and the depressingly ugly — urgently needs writing.


Op-Eds

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President Bacow, Implement Democracy Day

President Bacow, we call on you to institutionalize Democracy Day in 2022 and beyond. For one day of the academic calendar, Harvard should commit itself to taking the civic lessons taught inside its classrooms and applying them towards civic action to benefit the community. Only then can Harvard make good on its mission “to educate citizens and citizen leaders.”

If I Die, Don’t Put Me on Trial

But now, watching a Black man’s character being assassinated — as his actual assassin nonchalantly sits in the same room — I am exhausted. What I have learned from this past year is that after Black people die, after we are brutalized and harassed, we’re the ones on trial.

Never Have I Ever … Had a Normal College Semester

Regardless of what the next three years hold, I’m excited. I don’t need to be the main character or have a glow up; a normal day in the life with meals in dining halls and classes in person would be plenty. It’s been hard to have hope this year, but I can’t help but get excited for the in-person fall. Until then — never have I ever had a normal college semester.


Columns

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“Okay” and “Not Okay”: The Destructive Binary of Mental Health

Perhaps, as a world, and at institutions such as this university, if the majority of people stopped considering themselves to be completely different than the minority of people with recognized mental disorders, there would be a reduction in exclusionary behavior and an increase in the empathy that reducing this stigma so desperately requires. At the same time, dismantling this binary might convince the “okay” majority to not feel as though their mental health problems are insignificant, encouraging them to seek support.

We’re Not Socialists. Let’s Say So.

If we are going to take practical steps to address the extraordinary socioeconomic inequality and environmental degradation America’s underregulated capitalist market helped produce, Americans must stop associating regulation with socialism. Unfortunately, Republicans are not going to stop utilizing this effective — albeit inaccurate — critique. At least not until Democrats do something to counter this distorted narrative.

Unblocking Our Paths: Creating Visibility for Black Transgender Women and Femmes

When expanding this conversation of Black womanhood and our survival, we cannot stop the discussion of Black trans womanhood and femmehood at death. Black trans women and femmes have materialized and imagined worlds and futures that rupture and create space for all people’s survival. Learning and centering Black trans women and femmes in the reimagining of Black womanhood is vital to liberating Black women and our femininity from oppressive structures, and allows us to define womanhood for ourselves.

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