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In one of the later numbers of the Weekly Crimson some remarks were made editorially, concerning the freedom with which outsiders generally use the college yard. It seems to us that it may be well at the beginning of another college year to call attention once more to the abuse of the freedom of the yard, which is noticeable in the behavior of many of its frequenter. Of course these remarks are not intended to reflect upon the respectable Cantabrigians who pass through the yard daily on their way to and from their places of business or in pursuit of pleasure, for they know how to be have. But we do call especial attention to those who from their ignorance or youth are not to be expected to behave themselves unless repeatedly admonished-we mean the "muckers." Everyday during term-time the "mucker" is present in the yard in small or great quantities, and is so unrestrained by the usages of polite society that he be comes a positive nuisance. It is bad enough to be obliged to see these little rascals always about, but to hear their discordant yells, and to be followed about and to be literally besieged by them at some hours of the day, is more than can be patiently borne. But their presence is most of all obnoxious when there is a celebration of any kind in progress, on which occasions whether by day or by night, they intrude upon us in such crowds and in such varieties that the legitimate frequenters of the yard feel almost at their mercy. This is evidently not as it should be. If the college could detail a special officer to be in the yard at all times, whose particular duty should be to keep the grounds free from objectionable characters, we might hope for immediate relief. But we can hardly hope for such an appointment at present. In the meantime if every one will discourage these annoying pests as much as possible, and themselves put down all disturbances made by muckers, we may hope for at least partial tranquility.

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