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Opinion

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As it is hardly probable, from the present outlook, that the grounds enclosed by the new track will be ready for use early in the spring, the want of sufficient space for our sports will be as severely felt then as now. Particularly will this apply to tennis. Many valuable courts have been destroyed by the new athletic grounds and their loss is sorely felt. If the nine is obliged to practice on Jarvis in the spring, the number of courts cannot be greatly increased over the present limited supply and much discontent will be the result. To prevent this, the Tennis Association would do well to see if it cannot procure some additional land, perhaps in the vicinity of Divinity Hall, or even at Yale the students do not complain of the distance they are obliged to go to reach their athletic grounds at Hamilton Park. It is but a question of time when the increased numbers of students and the growing popularity of the game will necessitate some such course as this. The sooner it is done the better, as in a few years all the available land in this vicinity may be taken up, and grounds at a still greater distance will have to be procured. The Tennis association have recently shown so much life and vigor that it might well turn some of its enthusiasm to this much debated question of tennis grounds.

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