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We have perhaps reason to be thankful for the kindly interest taken in college athletics by the organs of professional athletes, such as the Clipper and Spirit of the Times. When any of these papers concede a slight amount of praise to the performances of college athletes do not our bosoms swell with grateful pride? On such occasions as the recent inter-collegiate meeting in New York, therefore, it should be our first effort to act so as to gain the approbation of the omniscient scribes who report for these journals. It is with feelings of the deepest delight that we notice that in one respect that meeting was an improvement over previous ones. "The spectators," we are informed by the Spirit of the Times, "were not so offensively and boisterously enthusiastic as in former years, and the din of college yells was less deafening than usual." This is truly gratifying. Some have heretofore erroneously supposed that a college meeting like this is held primarily for the benefit of the collegians themselves rather than for the exclusive satisfaction of the patrons of the professional field, and that a college meeting is a peculiarly appropriate occasion for the display of college enthusiasm. How absurd such a notion is it is not necessary to explain.

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