News

Annual Report Finds Harvard Kennedy School Faculty Remains Largely White, Male

News

Harvard Square Celebrates Oktoberfest

News

Harvard Corporation Members Donated Big to Democrats in 2020 Elections

News

City Council Candidates Propose Strategies for Supporting Low-Income Residents at Virtual Forum

News

FAS Dean Gay Hopes to Update Affiliates on Ethnic Studies Search by Semester’s End

TRINITY COLLEGE, DUBLIN.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

There is much about this celebrated college to invite an inspection by travelers and students. It was founded far back in the times of Queen Elizabeth under her auspices. The grounds are large and on them the college sports are held each year; but it is inside that we find most to hold the attention. The dining-hall, like our Memorial Hall, contains quite a collection of portraits. Among them, hung over the entrance door, is a full length of Frederick, Prince of Wales, taken in 1828. Pictures of Lord Caines, Flood, Napier, Lord Kilwarden, who was dragged from his coach and murdered in the streets, long ago, and of many others. The hall itself, is long and narrow with windows high on the sides. The benches are hard but the food provided is always good. At one end is an altar, over which grace is always said before each meal. Passing on from here we come to the library which contains 250,000 volumes, many of them of great age and value. The most precious is undoubtedly the famous "Book of Kells," an old illuminated work on parchment, of rare merit as a work of art. The library is open to studious citizens, as well as to those connected with the college and there is a tine reading hall for the use of all.

The chapel is a curious old place; the organ, about 300 years old, was taken from the Spanish Armada. It has beautifully carved panels worthy a careful inspection. The columns are of marble from Kilkenny. The reredos is said to be one of the finest church decorations in Europe. Here, also, there are more portraits, in short there are several of them in each of the principal rooms. The best picture extant of the foundress, Queen Elizabeth, is in the Trinity collection. Last of all there is the room of the director of the library; it is small and of no special interest in itself, but in it stands the chair of Charles Lever, the novelist. He sat in it when he wrote "Charles O'Malley" and others of his stirring novels. It is now the property of the college and has held since his time many other famous men. Previous to 1869, when the "Church Act," which has caused much bitter feeling on the part of the Irish, was passed, the revenues of Trinity college amounted $450,000; since then they have been much impaired.

Want to keep up with breaking news? Subscribe to our email newsletter.

Tags