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Julius Caesar in Sanders.

THE STAGE SETTING AND THE DRAMATIS PERSONAE.

Several years ago the stage of Sanders Theatre was utilized to represent the stage of a Greek theatre in the time of Sophocles. Next Monday evening the Shakspere Club will upon it undertake a task which is second in its difficulty only to the representation of Oedipus Tyrannus. Great labor has been expended upon the stage fittings of the play, and if success is deserved by hard and conscientious work the Shakspere Club need not fear for the success of their great venture. The peculiar formation of the stage in Sanders was found to be a great drawback to an easy utilization of the entire space, and it was only by employing a frieze to conceal the supports of the music loft that any degree of success could be attained. Upon either side of the stage will be a Roman house containing each a door. The back of the stage will be of a neutral shade, though the walls of the houses will extend some distance toward the centre of the background. A draw curtain will be employed. A raised platform in the rear centre will be used as the rostrum, whence Antonius will address the citizens. Caesar's throne will be on the spectators' left, while the senators will be placed upon the right A broad flight of steps will lead up from the orchestra, and there will be steps upon each side of the rostrum. This stage arrangement will serve as the foundation for subsequent changes as the play proceeds. The garden scene will be presented with great care, although the chief changes in the stage arrangements will be property changes. Roman vexilla and standards will be used, and Caesar's advent will be heralded by the approach of the ancient singe bearing upon them the SPQR. Great care has been expended upon the costumes. Artemidorus, the sophist, and the soothsayer will be dressed in a different manner from that of the hackneyed public stage-costumes. The dress of the citizens will conform as closely as possible to the time of the establishment of the Roman empire, and many scenes of the play promise to appear highly realistic. Over a hundred students will take part. The procession will enter from the rear of the stage, cross the stage obliquely, and retire by the opposite rear exit. The first three acts only of the play will be given. The leading roles of no two acts will be taken by the same gentlemen. The cast of the principals is essentially as follows: Julius Caesar, Mr. Cummings, '83; Marcus Antonius, Mr. Jones; Brutus, first act, Mr. Roundy, '85; third act, Mr. Hansen, '85; Cassius, first and second acts, Mr. Winter, '85; third act, Mr. Goodale, '85; Casca, first act, Mr. J. W. Richardson, '86; second act, Mr. Bowen, '85; Calphurnia, Mr. Sanford, '85.

Some of the largest men in college have offered to act as lictors, while prominent athletic men will personate the Senators. The vestal virgins will be personated by some of the smoother faced and more fair-haired sons of Harvard, and cannot, of course, be expected to give perfect satisfaction to the lictors' critical sense of female beauty. Mr. Lawrence Barrett has given valuable advice in the stage directions, and will aid in the management of the representation. While it is not to be expected that the leading roles will be filled in a manner which will compare favorably with the acting of our prominent actors, the play will nevertheless equal in interest representations of a much more ambitious nature. The performance will undoubtedly call out talent of no mean order, and every student who takes an interest in the live advancement of the college should encourage the Shakspere Club by lending it the encouragement of his presence in Sanders next Monday evening.

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