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Unitarian Harvard.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

A few years ago, and it may be safely stated even at the present time, in some portions of the country no phrase was more potent to dissuade parents from sending their sons to the leading American college than that of "Harvard Unitarianism." Putting aside all discussion of the religious question, how could such an absurd idea take possession of peoples minds that Harvard college was not only a training school for the mental qualities of its students, but also for their religious morals? "Any college that gives a preference for any one belief in religion and enforces such a belief on its members, must be narrow and must exert a bad influence over all who come under its sway." This has been said more than once by people who pride themselves on being well read and posted on educational subjects. It is extremely difficult to trace to its source any such report, and yet there must be some foundation for such positive statements. Undoubtedly the tendency of Harvard was Unitarian in the beginning of the century, and up to the last few years many of the instructors, fellows, and overseers have been of that faith. This would give some slight ground for questioning the influence of the college on the young minds of its members; yet the accusations go on and state that even the instructors avail themselves of the privlege they possess in addressing the students in recitation hours, and by hints and sneers at all other religious sects, make the men more inclined toward the faith of the college. This is a view of college that is most amusing to all who are within its precincts and get a glimpse of the true state of affairs, and it is only on account of the antiquity of the accusations that laughter is restrained. Age has given the charge a veneer of truth which modern investigation will scrape off in a few seconds showing the rottenness of the under structure.

No college in the United States has a more liberal tendency regarding religion than our own. Harvard does less at the present day to thrust any particular belief on the students than any foreign or indigenous institution of its kind. But the unfortunate reputation acquired in some past decade still clings vigorously in the minds of many, minds that must be either narrow or willfully ignorant. The services in the college chapel are of so unsec tarian a nature that any regular attender would soon see how absurd is the idea that brands Harvard as a "Unitarian college." A true view of the case can only be obtained by those who lead the daily life of the university and are in active contact with its observances. Unfortunately this impartial view cannot be obtained by outsiders, and as they express their opinions, whether favorable or unfavorable, freely, the college is in a measure, thrown into their power. These circulations about life at Harvard do great injury in their way, and ought to be stopped. The only way to check such ideas is for the authors to possess themselves of facts, before their make statements that are, mainly, fictitious, and are the outcomings of narrow minds.

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