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The Advocate.

The first number of Volume XLVI of the Advocate will appear today. With the beginning of the year a change of management is announced, Mr. Chas. Warren succeeding Mr. J. H. Sears as president and Mr. C. Hunneman taking the office of secretary.

The editorials are written with the usual force, though perhaps if the three on our athletic outlook were condensed into one, the effect might be more striking. The editorial on Bloody Monday punches is an expression of the best sentiment of the college and is a well-timed protest against a custom, which has become a disgrace. Ninety-two cannot complain of neglect. Mother Advocate, as she dubs herself editorially, coddles the freshmen with a tenderness almost touching, both in the editor's column and in "Topics of the Day." The latter is a few words of valuable advice which deserves the attention of the freshmen, and, if we may suggest of many upper classmen.

The short essay, "An Ambition," is an attempt to answer the old question "Is life worth living?" Its delicacy and thoughtfulness make one regret that it is not more elaborate. The idea of "Misericordia," is good and the style is clear and well-worded, but the brevity and disjointedness of the treatment detract much from the general effect of the story. Of a very different style is the story of "A Crime," from the French. It is vivid and picturesque, though the plot-a dream of a man who contemplated murder-is too horrible to be pleasant. The best article in the number is "Is in a Seaport Town." The description of the old decaying seaport town is charmingly written. The verse of the number consists of two college "poems" and a hunting song-"In Exmoor." Though the theme is an old one, it is well treated. The lines have a splendid galloping movement.

As a whole, this number is a good one, and the prospects are bright for a successful year.

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