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The Yale Crew.

As the Yale race is so near at hand, it may be of interest to know what is thought of our opponents by the men at New Haven. At present and in fact for the past few weeks the crew has labored under several disadvantages in the absence of several of their best men from the boat. Caldwell has been laid off for a week on account of sickness, and Brewster nearly as long. Both however, are at present gaining and it is hopeful that by the beginning of the week they will resume their seats in the boat. The great disadvantage from the sickness of these men, aside from the lack of practice, is that they have lost more weight than they could well afford to, and in case the weather should become very warm before they have got fully back into shape, there is danger of their getting overtrained. All the men individually row well, but their work together is not at all what can be desired. The enief difficulty they encounter is in keeping the boat steady and on an even keel. This is due to the following faults: First they do not pull entirely together nor with the same strength; second, some dip their oars too deep, while others do not dip deep enough; third some pull too much, others not enough, throwing the boat over to one side or the other. Their time is poor and they neither catch nor finish together. Although the foregoing is possibly a little exagerated, still it is certain that the crew will need to make a great deal of improvement to equal that of last year. Yet a great deal can and probably will be done between now and the race, as the men are all working hard, and sparing no pains to correct all these errors mentioned. The following are the names of the men, their positions and weights: No. 8, Caldwell, 151 pounds; 7, A len, 160 pounds; 6, Woodruff, 175 pounds; 5, Corbln, 186 pounds; 4, Hartwell, 169 pounds; 3, Brewster, 168 pounds; 2, Gill, 174 pounds; 1, Rogers, 159 pounds; coxswain, Thompson, 114 pounds.

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