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English 6.

Debate for November 20, 1890.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Question: Resolved, That the foreign policy of the United States should embrace the annexation of Canada.

Brief for the affirmative:

A. B. SIMONDS and G. B. WOOMER.

General References: Gold win Smith's Destiny of Canada; North American Review, vol. 131 p. 14; ibid Jan. 1889.

I. Canada is unfitted to become an independent nation because of [a] its geographical situation and physical configuration, [b] the lack of political unity; North American Review vol. 131 p. 14; Boston Herald, March 8-12, 1891; Review of Reviews, Feb. 1891.

II. English control of Canada has been a failure. [a] it has not developed the resources of the country. [b] the system of government is costly and unsuitable, [c] Canadian welfare has been sacrificed to British interests; Dublin Review, vol. 35 p. 151; Forum, July 1887; ibid March, 1889: August, 1889; Contemporary Review, Nov. 1881, Handbook of Commercial Union; Bourinot's Constitutional Manual of Canada; Bryce's American Common wealth. II. 410; Dilke's Problems of Great Britain c. 1; Payne's Colonial Dependencies.

III. Annexation would be mutually beneficial to the United States and to Canada; [a] trade would be stimulated and means of communication improved; [b] causes of political difference would disappear; [c] complications with foreign nations would be avoided; Nation, vol. 28, p. 171; American, vol. 1, p. 149; Durell's Relation of tariff to Wages.

II. Annexation could be peaceably effected; [a] England would not oppose the wishes of Canada; [b] the Canadian sentiment toward union is strong and increasing; Boston Post, March 7, 1891; Forum Nov., 1888; W. E. H. Leekyin North American Review, March, 1891.

Brief for the negative:

W. R. SEARS and L. B. WILLIAMS.

Best general references: Forum, V p. 634; Griswell's Canada, ch. XXIV.

I. There are practical difficulties in the way of Annexation. [a] The majority of the people of Canada do not desire it and are not likely to desire it in the future; Fort. Rev., March, 1891. p. 466; N. Amer. Rev., Vol. 148, p. 665; Griswell's Canada, 261. [b] Gt. Britain would oppose Annexation; Fort. Rev., Jan. 1891, p. 113.

II. Annexation would be dangerous to the United States. [a] Difficulties in making Canada's Parliamentary system conform to our Congressional; [b] From so great an increase of territory; [c] would increase the number of foreign born citizens. [d] Would increase the religious complications. [e] There would be a new sectional issue. [f] Difficulty in adjusting the debt; No. Amer. Rev., vol. 150, p. 404.

III. Reciprocity without being dangerous would be as beneficial to the United States; N. Amer. Rev., March, 1891, vol. 152.

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