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Book Notice.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Mrs. Phelps Ward's last novel "Come Forth," is a romantic story treated in an unusual way. The tale carries one to Jerusalem in the days of Lazarus, the skilled master-builder, who, while at work on the house of Annas, the exhigh priest, falls in love with Zahara, Annas' beautiful daughter. By a miracle Christ aids Lazarus in saving Zahara from death by drowning which bridges over the social gulf between them. All is well except that Lazarus refuses to deny the Nasarene, and for their devotion Christ finally brings about the marriage. It is a story much more fit for the middle ages than for the faith of modern times. The personality of Christ is sharply but reverently drawn.

[Come Forth. By Elizabeth Stuart Phelps and Herbert D. Ward. Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Co., $1.25.]

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