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Mr. Sherwood Eddy's address before the Y. M. C. A. last night was, full of interesting ideas which brought the subject of foreign missions before the students in a new light. Doubtless his remarks will turn the thoughts of a good many men to a consideration of foreign missionary labor as their line of work for the future. There is great need today for educated young men in all kinds of missionary work. Home missionary work is much more liable to look out for itself, however, than labor of this kind abroad. There is a growing interest today among college men in the great questions which are agitating society. The college settlements and institutions like the Prospect Union are nothing else than one phase of missionary work, though they are not called missions. The lower and higher classes of society are being brought closer than ever together by the present hard times, and the rich and the educated are beginning to see that they are in a way responsible for the poor and the ignorant. If there is to be a dearth, therefore, of helpers in the line of missionary endeavor, it is not likely to be felt at home nearly so soon as abroad. The call to leave home and friends to go to a foreign country where everything is uncertain, is not so inviting as work in one's own country. Yetan earnest, fearless spirit will not be daunted by this, and college men who feel themselves naturally fitted for foreign missionary work, can do nothing nobler than to go into it.

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