News

Harvard Law School Makes Online Zero-L Course Free for All U.S. Law Schools Due to Coronavirus

News

For Kennedy School Fellows, Epstein-Linked Donors Present a Moral Dilemma

News

Tenants Grapple with High Rents and Local Turnover at Asana-Owned Properties

News

In April, Theft Surged as Cambridge Residents Stayed at Home

News

The History of Harvard's Commencement, Explained

No Headline

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

THROUGH the courtesy of the Advocate board, we had the pleasure of being represented at the annual dinner of the Editors, which took place at the Parker House, on Friday evening, the 6th of February. It was a most agreeable entertainment. Full justice having been done to the dinner, the first speech of the evening was given by the Rev. Edward Everett Hale, who responded to the toast of our Alma Mater. He referred with much feeling to his college days, and advocated the keeping up of college feeling, and a community of interests among the students as sons of a common Alma Mater. He advised young journalists to regard matter more than form, and maintained that any one with something to say could express it. As an alumnus of the College, and an editor of distinction himself, his remarks were listened to with great interest. He was followed by Professor William Everett, who spoke of some of the peculiarities of student life in the English Universities, alluding to the manner in which students there eat together in their own rooms as worthy of imitation here. In regard to oratory, boating, etc., in which we are apt to consider ourselves far behind English students, his remarks were most flattering. Mr. F. C. Faulkner, President of the Magenta board, next responded to the toast of "the Magenta." Mr. Griswold, '75, was present to represent the contributors, who were next toasted. Mr. Dana spoke in behalf of the University Crew, controverting in a humorous manner those persons who contend that training is injurious to the health. The Ball Nine was represented by its captain, Mr. Tyler, who was in turn followed by Mr. Jaques, the spokesman of the editors elect from '76, Mr. Swift, '77, and Mr. Prince, '73, who spoke for the past editors. Others followed, till the parting toast of the evening was proposed by Mr. Everett to his friend and pupil, Mr. W. R. Tyler, the President of the Advocate board, who was prevented by sickness from being present. The latter gentleman's duties as presiding officer were admirably performed by Mr. Sanger, to whom is due in large measure the success with which the occasion passed off. After singing "Auld Lang Syne" in the time-honored manner, the assembly broke up. We take this opportunity of expressing our gratification at the fact, frequently alluded to in the speeches of the evening, of the perfect friendship and good-will which have existed between the two papers during the past year, and to express the hope, the fulfilment of which we see no reason to doubt, that the same harmony and good feeling may prevail in the future.

Want to keep up with breaking news? Subscribe to our email newsletter.

Tags