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English 6.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

DEBATE OF MARCH 27, 1890.Question: "Resolved, That the Blair education bill should be passed by congress."

Brief for the Affirmative.J. C. Hayes and C. C. Blaney.

Best general references: Congressional Record, vol. 17, part II., pp. 1237-1283, 1468 1485; North American Review, vol. 136, p. 337; Public Opinion, February 25, 1888.

I. 1, Necessity of government aid. Many of the states demand better facilities for education.- Congressional Record, vol. 17, part II., pp. 1244 and 1245; Lalor's Encyclopaedia, vol. 3, p. 1009. 2, The same states unable to provide themselves with adequate means for education.- Congressional Record, vol. 17, part II., 1257, 1258, and 1259. 3. United States should supply the deficiency.

II. 1, National aid to education is afforded by the principal European monarchies.- Congressional Record, vol. 17, part II., p. 1241. 2, Such aid a democratic government is especially in need of; it requires universal education.- Congressional Record, vol. 17, part II., p. 1240. 3, The United States is bound to educate its freedmen.- Congressional Record, June 19, 1888. p. 566.

III. 1, The bill is national, not local, in its operation.- Public Opinion, February 25, 1888; Congressional Record, vol. 17, part II., p. 1474; North American Review, vol. 136, p. 337. 2, It encourages local effort on the part of the states.- Congressional record, vol. 17, part II., p. 1468.

IV. The bill is constitutional.- Constitution, article 1, section 8; Congressional Record, vol. 17, part II., p. 1470-1475; Von Holst, Congressional Law, section 97, pp. 304-5; McCullough vs. Maryland, 4 Wheaton, 316.

Brief for the Negative.Robert J. Carey and F. L. Olmsted.

Best general references: Congressional Record, vol. 17, part II., pp. 1337 41; Public Opinion, December 28; Nation, March 13, Jan. 30, Jan. 9, Jan. 16, Nation, vol. 42, pp. 121, 142, 207, 265, American Catholic Quarterly, XIII., 345; Critic, VIII, 265.

It is unwise to pass the Blair bill because: (a) It is obviously a local measure.- Congressional Record, pp. 1238. (b) It is based upon statistics clearly false at the present time.- Nation, vol. 42, p. 207. (c) The apportionment is made on a false standard.- Nation, March 13, 1890, p. 212.

II. It is injurious to the states: (a) It is an assumption of paternal functions by the general government and an invasion of the sovereignty and independence of the states.- Nation, Jan. 16, 1890, p. 43. (b) It cripples and destroys local interest in the school.- American Catholic Quarterly, XIII., p. 345. (c) It puts a premium upon illiteracy and mendicancy.- Ibid. (d) It is a temptation to fraud.

III. It is of doubtful constitutionality. (a) It violates the general welfare clause of the constitution. (b) It makes a national measure subject to the will of the states.- Congressional Record, vol. 17, part II., pp. 1337-1341.

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