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Mr. Winsor's Address.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Mr. Justin Winsor received the members of the Southern Club at his home last evening and addressed them on "The Perits of Historical Narrative."

Mr. Winsor began by dwelling on accuracy in historical statement. We are often deceived by the disguises of truth. She is hidden from us by strange raiments and only sharp eyes and learned research can unmask her. We must have the courage of the moth and let our wings be singed by approaching the light. No historical statement can be final, and it is this very uncertainly that keeps research perennial. The successful historian employs the same talents as the successful merchant, penetration and keen judgment of character. But in history we must never forget how important the personal basis and opinions of the narrator are. Tingard says no class of writers have done more to injure history than philosophical writers. What is called comparative history is as far as we can go in philosophical history. The historian may be sagaciously profound without being philosophical. Moral philosophy may draw facts from history but history is no scheme of moral philosophy.

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