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University Calendar.

6. THURSDAY.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

4. MONDAY.Classical Philology 1. Roman Private Antiquities. Professor Greenough. Harvard 1, 3.30 p. m.

Open to all members of the University.

Lecture. The Forerunners of the Republican Party in the Northwest. Mr. T. C. Smith. University 20, 3.30 p. m.

Geology 10 and 11. Persons intending to take either of these courses will meet the Instructor in Room 1a, 4th floor, University Museum, at 4 p. m.

Botanical Club. Desert Vegetation (illustrated by the stereopticon). Professor Goodale. Botanical Museum, 7.30 p. m.

Boylston Chemical Club. The Salt Mines at Stassfurth. Dr. T. W. Richards. Boylston 9, 7.30 p. m.

Open to the public.

Lecture. Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, the Angel of Poetry and the Angel of Prose. Mr. Copeland. Sever 11, 8 p. m.

The hour will include reading by Mr. Copeland from Cervantes, Lowell's London "Notes" on "Don Quixote," and Mr. Higginson's speech in gift of the Soldiers' Field.

Open to all members of the University.

5. TUESDAY.Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University 5, 4 p. m.

Geological Conference. Papers: The Geology of Hingham, Mr. J. Underhill; Ripple-marked Sandstones, Mr. T. A. Jaggar. Geological Laboratory, 7.45 p. m.

6. WEDNESDAY.Board of Overseers. Adjourned Meeting at No. 50 State St., Boston. 11 a. m.

Classical Philology 1. Roman Private Antiquities. Professor Greenough. Har-1, 3.30 p. m.

Open to all members of the University.

Commemoration of Francis Parkman. Addresses by President Eliot (who will occupy the chair), John Fiske, and Justin Winsor. The Harvard Glee Club will sing. Sanders Theatre, 7.45 p. m.

Open to the public.

7. THURSDAY.English 6. Oral Debate. Harvard 6, 3.30 p. m.

Question: "Resolved, That the United States should take immediate steps toward complete ownership and management of the telegraph."

Principal Disputants.- Affirmative: C. F. Clarkson and L. Coolidge.- Negative: E. R. Coffin and W. E. Cobb.

Open to all students of the University.

Lecture. The Teaching of French: 6. Translation and Dictation. Professor de Sumichrast, Sever 23, 4.30 p. m.

Open to all members of the University.

First Vesper Service of the Year. The Chapel Choir, with the Choir of St. Paul's Church, Boston, will sing Garrett's Harvest Cantata. Appleton Chapel, 5 p. m.

Vesper Services will be held on Thursday of each week during term time until further notice. Each service begins promptly at 5 p. m., and closes about 5.30.

The public are invited to these services.

Symphony Orchestra Concert. Sanders Theatre, 7.45 p. m.

8. FRIDAY.Classical Philology 1. Roman Private Antiquities. Professor Greenough. Harvard 1, 3.30 p. m.

Open to all members of the University.

Divinity School. Preaching Service. Divinity Chapel, 7.30 p. m.

Open to the public.

Wendell Phillips Club. Wendell Phillips and his Relations to Modern Oratory. Colonel Higginson. Sever 11, 8 p. m.

Open to the public.

LECTURES ON THE FINE ARTS.A course of five evening lectures, on the Decorative Painting of the Renaissance and its lesson for the present times, will be given by Mr. Edwin Howland Blashfield, of New York City, in Boylston 7, as follows:

Dec. 12.- 1. The importance of studying the Renaissance.

Dec. 13.- 2. The city of the Renaissance, its pictorial conditions, and their relations to ours.

Dec. 14.- 3. The decorative painting of the Renaissance and its bearing upon modern decoration. 1250-1500.

Dec. 19.- 4. The decorative painting of the Renaissance and its bearing upon modern decoration. 1450-1588.

Dec. 20.- 5. Municipal Art; and our opportunity in America.

These lectures will be open to the public.

UNIVERSITY LECTURES.During the year 1893-94, Mr. Copeland will give a number of lectures on literature, of which the subjects and the dates will be announced in this Calendar. The chief object of these lectures will be to stimulate interest in books and to suggest lines of reading to such members of the University as desire some knowledge of English Literature without the minute study demanded by the regular courses of instruction.

The first lecture-on Don Quixote and Sancho Panza-will be given in Sever Hall, Monday evening, December 4, at 8 o'clock. The method and the purpose of the whole course will then be explained, and therefore all members of the University are especially asked to be present.

Until further notice, the lectures will be given on successive Monday evenings.

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