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The lecture last evening by Gen. Crook on the Indian question gave the students of Harvard, as well as the citizens of Cambridge, an opportunity to listen to the most famous Indian fighter in the country. That Gen. Crook, a principal actor in the stirring scenes which are constantly being enacted on the frontier, and a man whose bravery and intrepidity are as well known as his patriotism, and his earnestness in defence of the oppressed race for whom he speaks, should deliver an address in Sanders Theatre, seems to remind us once again of the many privileges enjoyed by Harvard students of listening to distinguished gentlemen. But no one, perhaps, has more deeply interested his audience than the speaker of last night. We all acknowledge a thrill of delight in listening to a man who has really fought the Apaches, who knows what it is to be on the warpath and who is not merely a newspaper hero. Although the Cambridge Indian Rights Association, perhaps, did not have Harvard students particularly in mind when Sanders Theatre was selected as the place for the meeting, we assure the association that Harvard appreciated the opportunity to hear Gen. Crook. We hope that other Cambridge societies may follow this example in inviting other speakers to Sanders Theatre.

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