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The Advocate.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The last number of the Advocate is hardly up to the standard set by the new board of editors. The stories, though most of them pleasing, show no particular depth. "The Unmaking of a Soldier," by Frank Simonds '00 is not a new story, but is fairly well told. "Four Characters," by W. Stevens '01, goes rather deeper than most of the Advocate's contributions. "A Morning's Catch," by F. M. Class '03, is a lively, pleasing story of the usual "storiette" type. "Pipe No. 29," by H. W. Bynner' 02, depicts vividly the Chinese character, but leaves a bad taste in the mouth. "The Rendezvous," by E. B. Ahlborn '02, is a commonplace story with an obvious and unnecessarily pointed moral. "In the Elk Fields," by J. C. G. is a vivid bit of life-like description. The color is good and the writer happily does not attempt anything beyond him in word-painting. Of the two pieces of verse, the sonnet "To a Wilderness," by F. R. Dickinson' 03, attempts rather too much and does not end strongly.

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