News

Annual Report Finds Harvard Kennedy School Faculty Remains Largely White, Male

News

Harvard Square Celebrates Oktoberfest

News

Harvard Corporation Members Donated Big to Democrats in 2020 Elections

News

City Council Candidates Propose Strategies for Supporting Low-Income Residents at Virtual Forum

News

FAS Dean Gay Hopes to Update Affiliates on Ethnic Studies Search by Semester’s End

CHANGE THE HAMMER-THROW.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

It is understood that at the annual meeting of the New England Intercollegiate Athletic Association to be held Saturday in Boston, the question of the hammer-throw is to come up for discussion. This is a subject long agitated. Last June on the day of the intercollegiate meet in Philadelphia, the CRIMSON printed interviews with the coaches of a number of leading colleges, all but one of whom favored the abolition or modification of this dangerous event. The numerous accidents in recent years have not all by any means been due to carelessness: they are apparently an inherent risk of the hammer-throw as it is at present constituted. It may be unwise to abolish altogether an event which tests so well both strength and skill. But another year should not go by without a radical modification of the throw to eliminate its objectionable features. Whether this should be by increasing the weight of the hammer, by decreasing the length of the handle, or by some other means, is for experts to determine. The change should at any rate be sufficient to allow the event to be seen by spectators without unduly endangering life and limb. It should be such as to retain the good features of the hammer-throw, and must eliminate the very obvious objections to the present event.

Want to keep up with breaking news? Subscribe to our email newsletter.

Tags