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DARTMOUTH'S SOCIAL CENTRE

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

In every university, there has long been apparent the need of a democratic social centre. Harvard has the Union, Pennsylvania has Haughton Hall, Chicago has its Commons, Yale is contemplating a centre more like the famous Oxford Union than any yet built; the designation differs with the college, but nearly every institution either already has or hopes soon to have a social centre. To supplement her Commons, Dartmouth is soon to have Robinson Hall, the gift of Mr. Wallace T. Robinson, of Boston, which will be unique among college social centres in that its purpose is primarily to afford a home for all undergraduate non-athletic interests. It is to be a handsome two and a half story building of brick and lime-stone, situated on the campus. On the first floor will be ample offices for the publications, the Musical Clubs, the Band, the Dramatic Club, the Debating Union and other undergraduate organizations. The second floor is to be reserved for a proposed honorary society which will recognize literary and artistic distinction. Here will be suitable reading, lounging and reception rooms, and a small audience hall for impromptu dramatics and musicales. In the attic will be rehearsal rooms, while in the basement will be found lockers and storage for the properties of the various organizations.

Dartmouth is indeed to be congratulated upon her good fortune in being able to bring together the various undergraduate organizations, a feat not yet accomplished at any other college. Here at Harvard, so comprehensive an institution would now be an impossibility. Many organizations do not need such a home. But there are some organizations, notably the Musical Club, the various language societies, the school and territorial clubs, and others whose present quarters in dormitory rooms are cramped and unsatisfactory. The movement of the Federated Territorial Clubs to secure permanent quarters in the Union is an initial expression of dissatisfaction with old conditions. For many now nomadic organizations, a building specially equipped to receive them would mean new life, new opportunity. As the University grows the Union will not be able to shelter them all, and a building similar in design to Robinson Hall at Dartmouth will be a necessity.

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