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IN THE WORLD OF LETTERS.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The influence of Harvard men in the realm of letters and scholarship is well set forth in the current American Review of Reviews which devotes several of its pages to a review of the recent authoritative books on social and economic subjects, and to some of the worthy works in the sphere of literature. In connection with the problem of railroads, the review points out that the whole subject of railroad rates and regulations is covered with great thoroughness and clarity in a volume of Professor William Z. Ripley. Among the works treating industrial questions, is noted as worthy of commendation Dr. M. T. Copeland's book on the cotton-manufacturing industry. In the discussion of works dealing with industrial efficiency the Review emphasizes the fact that Professor Hugo Muensterburg has written and published much regarding the practical application of psychology to the problems of everyday life, and points out that his most recent contribution on the subject is a volume devoted to the relations of psychology to industrial efficiency. Turning to the field of Municipal Government, the reviewer calls attention to Professor William B. Munro's volume on "Government of American Cities," which he describes as a systematic treatise. Among books containing suggestions for law makers is "The Family: An Historical and Social Study," by Charles F. Thwing '76, President of Western Reserve University. Two other books of notable attainments are: "Studies in the History of Religions," by members of the New York Harvard Club; and "The Spirit of American Literature," by John Albert Macy of the English Department.

This extensive list of commendable contributions to various fields of learning and on pressing problems of the day demonstrates the large influence Harvard men are wielding in moulding current thought, and illustrates how contact between University and Nation is rendered more intimate through the writings of graduates and professors.

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