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PESTS: ELM TREE AND OTHERWISE

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

All the Yard is divided into three parts: grass, buildings, and paths. The grass was planted to make the Yard look green and beautiful, the buildings were built to hold recitations and students; and the paths, or places where there is no grass, were made to connect all the buildings, so that students could go from building to building easily. Some students don't know these things. They think that the grass was planted to prevent sore feet from walking on the hard paths. And they don't know that it is a sign of mental weakness to change their minds when half-way between two buildings and decide to go somewhere across the grass where they had not intended. Other students know all these things, however, and like to conceal it. So these students see how near they can come to the paths without stepping on them. They soon become very proficient in avoiding them and destroy the grass rapidly. They remind us of the elm tree beetles that have destroyed the Yard elms, only the beetles don't know any better. The University has trouble enough with these ignorant pests without having to waste time and money to repair the damage done by the knowing but careless.

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