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HARWOOD DONOR OF CUP FOR FRESHMAN VAULTERS

THINK NEW SURFACE WILL NOT SLOW UP TRACK

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Robert Walker Harwood '21, prominent pole vaulter for three years on the university track team and present coach of the pole vaulters, announced yesterday that he would be the donor of a new cup to be awarded to that Freshman who during his first year makes the greatest improvement in pole vaulting. Coach Harwood has been working with a large group of pole vaulters since the beginning of March, but only a very few of this number are Freshmen.

The purpose of the new cup, the competition for which is open to any Freshmen with or without previous experience, is to stimulate interest in this important branch of track work. The cup will be on exhibition at Leavitt & Pierce's next week.

Season Starts Friday at Penn Relays

At 3 o'clock today there will be a meeting of both the Freshman and the University squads in the Locker Building at Soldiers Field in preparation for the season, which starts on Friday with the medley relay and hammer throw events at the Penn Relays for the University, and with the Exeter meet for the Freshmen.

The track at Soldiers Field has been almost completely made over since last spring. An eight-inch surface was put on during the summer and new concrete poles around the border have recently been completed.

New Surface Will Not Slow Track

For many years the Harvard track has been reputed to be the fastest in the world. However it has been the opinion of many critics that the new surface would deaden it to a considerable extent. When questioned about this, Major F. W. Moore '93 said the track should be as fast as ever this spring. It is difficult to say what the effect has been so early in the season.

Twelve years ago, three days before the intercollegiate track meet it was decided to widen the track so that five men could run in the 220-yard hurdles at the same time. As the track was large enough for only four men, a new strip had to be added before the meet. This was done under the supervision of Dennis Enwright, who was also in charge of this year's work. So expertly was the work done that the hurdler running on the new piece won the race.

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