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COLLIER AND OTTO MOUNT UNION PLATFORM TONIGHT

VERSATILE ARTIST NOW ON STAFF OF BOSTON AMTRICAN

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Franklin P. Collier will speak at the Union this evening at 7.30 o'clock. He will be accompanied by Mr. Otto Grow who by now is familiar to most CRIMSON readers. He has already contributed an interview and a review of the Lampoon to the daily columns.

This evening Mr. Grow will aid Mr. Collier in explaining the "Trials of a Cartoonist's Life." Mr. Grow is expected to be accompanied by several members of his rather extensive family, and members of the audience will be asked to help him in providing amusement for his hosts.

Otto Is Eight Years Old

Mr. Collier spoke at the Union last year where his drawings were very popular. He has been making cartoons for 20 years and Otto Grow for eight. He has worked almost entirely on New England publications. The Boston Herald enjoyed his services until last fall when he transferred to the American. A CRIMSON reporter, where he interviewed him recently, was received in his office in the American building. Mr. Collier and the office gave an atmosphere of both art and business. Mr. Collier was kind enough to bring out his various pictures and cartoons and show them to his interviewer. He then went to work on the cartoon that was to be finished that evening and explained as he went along his methods of getting desired effects.

Squashed Hat Important

"The squashed hat is the decisive factor in most of my drawings," he said. "Just notice if you don't usually look at that first. It makes it easier for me as I don't have to draw a face. It might also be better if some real people wore their hats like that. They might be hand-somer."

As a rule it takes Mr. Collier four hours to make his daily contribution. It is usually in the form of a strip of four pictures. The rest of the day is his own and he devotes it to allied subjects. He has tried painting in oils and in water-colors, sculpture, and writing, humorous essays chiefly. He has always returned to caricaturing, however.

The talk this evening will be open to all members of the Union only. Drawings will be available for those who are quick and strong enough to secure them.

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