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BIG THREE TICKET RISE MEETS GENERAL FAVOR

BROWN SEES STEP AS BLOW TO FUTURE OF ATHLETICS

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The recently announced action of the Athletic Association in raising the price which graduates must pay to attend Big Three football games, has been greeted by almost unanimous approval in the editorial comment which it has evoked. The Brown Daily Herald stands almost alone in condemning the action.

The New York Times greets the step as reasonable in every respect. Its comment follows in part:

"Undergraduate opinion is right, of course, in deprecating the emphasis now placed on championship games, right in raising the slogan of 'Athletics for All'. It may even be right in urging, as the CRIMSON does, that the movement should not be abandoned to 'the ingenuity of the Athletic Association, but should be sponsored and financed by the University. In any case, Old Graduate will foot the bill. 'C'est son metier!'"

The Brown Herald regards the action as "a blow that adroitly puts to flight the false hopes we fostered for the future of athletics". The comment goes on to say:

"Commercialism, overemphasis, stadiamania -- football, a contributory cause to the existence of American universities, labored under the constant application of these terms but a few months ago. And then undergraduates at Harvard, originators of much that is worthy in American academic life, gave the public cause to hope that football would be restored to its rightful place. The standards of value in university life were to be set aright by direct action from Cambridge.

"Now comes a blow that helps shake the cobwebs from our brains, shatter the illusions that clouded our reason, and adroitly puts to flight the false hopes we fostered for the future of athletics. Football is to become an even larger source of revenue for great universities, a more important factor in the commercial life of institutions for the development of 'educated men' and leaves still farther behind its career as a great game, when played for sport, before tainted with professionalism."

The New York Herald Tribune considers the use to which the increased revenue will be put as "justification for the step." It goes on to say: "The greater the number of undergraduates competing in some form of athletic endeavor the better it will be for the college and for amateur sport in general. What to some may seem an intensification of the spirit of commercialism may possibly bring quite different results."

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