News

Amid Boston Overdose Crisis, a Pair of Harvard Students Are Bringing Narcan to the Red Line

News

At First Cambridge City Council Election Forum, Candidates Clash Over Building Emissions

News

Harvard’s Updated Sustainability Plan Garners Optimistic Responses from Student Climate Activists

News

‘Sunroof’ Singer Nicky Youre Lights Up Harvard Yard at Crimson Jam

News

‘The Architect of the Whole Plan’: Harvard Law Graduate Ken Chesebro’s Path to Jan. 6

FELICES TER ET AMPLIUS

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Traffic policemen in Dorchester and Squantum were surprised last evening to see a mist rising out of the sidewalks, something they had not seen before. A more than clever member of the Squantum, or the Dorchester, force, remarked that the mist was in a sense a significant item and seemed really romantic. But the captain at the desk suggested that there was in it more the suggestion of a classic influence. So both played checkers for two hours in the hope of solving the problem.

At eight o'clock one of them discovered that the mist had entered the heaven of headquarters. And then they knew that the mist was a renascence of that spirit of learning so much a part of college life for policemen are, in a sense collegians. Both then drank ginger beer to the health of learning and smiled at each other over the checker board. Though seven people were shot in Dorchester and a bank in Squantum was robbed, each decided that the spirit of education, being what it seemed, was ater all, worth the sacrifice. And each had engraved on his coat of arms "Felices Ter Et Amplius", which of course has much more to do with conjugal bliss than the spirit of learning but "policemen are policemen", as the Countess of Niblick once said in all truth and consequences.

Want to keep up with breaking news? Subscribe to our email newsletter.

Tags