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TILDEN FINDS ACTIVITY HARM TO COLLEGE TENNIS

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

New Haven, Conn., June 7, 1926.--In an interview given to the Yale Daily News today, William T. Tilden 2nd, national lawn tennis champion for six successive years, notes a decided decrease in the quality of college tennis during the last two years.

"It is difficult to assign any definite reasons or canses for the decline in playing brilliance in college circles," Tilden said, "but I am convinced that it is only a temporary one. Perhaps it is a natural reaction to the intense enthusiasm for the sport in 1920, and the following season which so greatly increased its popularity and the proficiency of the undergraduate players of that time.

"Another obstacle to the perfection of college tennis is the fact that the average university man of today busies himself with too many activities and does not feel that he can devote very much of his time to any one of them especially to a minor sport, as tennis is considered. Then again, tennis matches come at an unfortunate time in the college year, the very peak of activities, when it is difficult to find time to plug away at the game."

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