News

Amid Boston Overdose Crisis, a Pair of Harvard Students Are Bringing Narcan to the Red Line

News

At First Cambridge City Council Election Forum, Candidates Clash Over Building Emissions

News

Harvard’s Updated Sustainability Plan Garners Optimistic Responses from Student Climate Activists

News

‘Sunroof’ Singer Nicky Youre Lights Up Harvard Yard at Crimson Jam

News

‘The Architect of the Whole Plan’: Harvard Law Graduate Ken Chesebro’s Path to Jan. 6

CRIMSON PLAYGOER

"The Desert Song" Combines Melodrama And Attractive Music by Sigmund Romberg

By A. G. C.

A rough Riff Robin Hood is the protagonist in "The Desert Song", a tuneful expose of Mohammedan love-technique now on view at the Majestic Theatre. Yelept "The Red Shadow" (rhymes with "go, snow, or know") this brigand leads his turbaned tenors to several well-earned choral triumphs over Post 13 of the Moroccan Legion.

For a musical play, the action of "The Desert Song" is intricate. Pierre Birabeau, played by Robert Halliday, is known in North African social circles as the half-wit son of Governor-General Birabeau. But this is only an assumed role; among the Riffs, Pierre is really none other than "The Red Shadow", a renegade white man who leads the natives on nocturnal forays. His dual activities are not suspected and they give him a lot of good harmless fun until love arrives in the attractive form of Miss Ethel Louise Wright as Margot Bonvalet, a visiting Parisienne.

Pierre becomes involved when he engineers an abduction--object matrimony--this of Mam'selle Bonvalet. Her fiance and the General, both Legionnaires, turn out in pursuit. It is not until after a hectic harem scene and a few Sahara serenades that "The Shadow" ("Shad", for short) emerges the winner on points: the Parisenne on one arm and a reconciled father on the other.

Eddie Buzzell, as a newspaper correspondent who is captured by "a thousand, no, more than that--ten hundred Riffs," furnishes the amusement. His prayer to Allah, beginning "you know me, Al," is a gem. This comic interpolation, combined with Sigmund Romber's music, suffices to make "The Desert Song" entertainment of the first rank.

Want to keep up with breaking news? Subscribe to our email newsletter.

Tags