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The History of Harvard's Commencement, Explained

THE MATURE MIND

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The decision of the faculty to place the advanced French and German examinations of the College Entrance Board on equality with Latin Cp 4 as a satisfaction of the language requirements logically rounds out the recent acceptance for entrance credit of a fourth year at school of a modern language. A slow moving policy of freeing the undergraduate years from most elementary work is thus advanced. And the path of those who are prepared is cleared of the annoying obstacle of a reading examination or college course in a foreign language.

Under the latest rulings an adequately equipped Freshman may now entirely anticipate his English and foreign language requirements. Guided by the rules for concentration and distribution, his four years in college are open for any advanced study that may suit his fancy.

goodly proportion of advanced work is necessary if college training is to go beyond the secondary school stage of mental gymnastics. But where the demands of mechanical and rote memory work hang heavy over an advanced field the activity there is crippled. Only when men are freed from this threat can they go forward.

It is true that today's statement of the modification of the language requirements affects only the man well enough equipped in school to meet the University's reading examinations. Although the new rule takes no serious burden from anyone's shoulders, it does show the decided position of the faculty in encouraging the completion of elementary work in school. Given time, this policy will reap its reward in Freshmen better able to seize the advantages of college.

It is true that today's statement of the modification of the language requirements affects only the man well enough equipped in school to meet the University's reading examinations. Although the new rule takes no serious burden from anyone's shoulders, it does show the decided position of the faculty in encouraging the completion of elementary work in school. Given time, this policy will reap its reward in Freshmen better able to seize the advantages of college.

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