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OLD HEADS AND YOUNG SHOULDERS

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Recent examinations at the University of California have been employed to prove that the adult mind is superior to the youthful intellect in the acquisition of book learning. Although the results of these tests seem to demonstrate that mature persons absorb knowledge more efficiently, still it should be kept in mind that this condition is not entirely, or perhaps even partially, due to differences in actual ability.

When a person of advanced years makes the sacrifice of his time, and what is still more important, of his own money, he is motivated by a strong desire for further knowledge. It is not a question of satisfying the ambitions of a parent or guardian. On the other hand, an alarming percentage of undergraduates clutter halls of learning for no other reason than to preserve a family tradition, or to stave off contact with an office desk for a few more years. Again, the difference between a mature person taking an elementary language course in preparation for next summer's trip abroad and a freshman doing the same to appease the powers that be is not a sound basis for conclusions. Viewed fairly, the difference between the adult and the youth is more often one of intensity of interest and seriousness of purpose than of mental aptitude.

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