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AN AULD ACQUAINTANCE

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

In the interesting resume of Harvard's eating customs which appears elsewhere in today's CRIMSON, the most relevant contribution is the fact that the "High Table" at one time proposed for the House Plan, would be merely a continuance of a Harvard tradition with only a slight twinge of anglican influence in its makeup. While the resurrection of the before-and-after-dinner "blessing" might prove rather amusing, the suggestion to perpetrate Harvard's past through the medium of the High Table, a purely British extraction despite its 300 years of acclimation, holds very little appeal.

The argument against this mode of gastronomic procedure was not wholly because of its anglophile coloring. The House Plan is admittedly an experimentation, and one which includes a definite intermingling of teachers with pupils. Besides being an anachronism in America, the whole idea of placing such a definite barrier between the tutors and students is distinctly alien to the success of the Plan. The objections to the High Table are just as applicable whether it is English or American. Everyone is well-enough satisfied at the first solution of this relatively unimportant detail. The House Plan means a break with many of Harvard's more important traditions; a plea for the High Table as such has very little basis.

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