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THE NEW THEATRE

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

In spite of an almost supercilious attitude on the part of many critics and actors, the motion picture has been firmly entrenching itself as a form of actual drama. It is true that the artistic development has in many instances fallen behind the technical growth of this industry but aside from the great mass of so called popular films there are Reveal organizations that are actually attempting to synchronize the latest mechanical advances with progressive artistic interpretation. The fact that the recent lectures of S. M. Eisenstein, the leading exponent of advanced films, are receiving such close and intelligent observation is an undeniable indication that, in spite of Jane Cowl, the motion picture has shown tremendous possibilities.

Popularization such as the purely commercial talking pictures are forced into necessarily precludes a very considerable amount of mediocrity. But even in this field there have been several notable examples of excellent drama. In addition to this, such productions as M. Eisenstein's "Ten Days That Shook The World" and "Potemkin", conscious at tempts at pure artistry, do much to warrant the existence of the motion picture as an individual art divorced from the stage. That M. Eisenstein is lecturing in the Baker Library of the Business School Monday night under the auspices of the Department of Fine Arts and the Cambridge School of the Drama is in itself an indication of the artistic future of the films.

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