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DR. GRENFELL DESCRIBES ESQUIMAU HARDSHIPS

COLLECTION TAKEN FOR BENEFIT OF HOSPITAL

Describing through the use of actual picture slides the hardships and privations encountered by the Esquimaux of Labrador in their daily life, Sir Wilfred Grenfell, world famous founder and promoter of the Grenfell Mission, explained last night to a large audience in Phillips Brooks House the nature and extent of difficulties faced by doctors and nurses who devote their lives to humanitarian work among the natives.

Emphasizing the economic as well as the physical handicaps under which the Esquimaux exist, Sir Wilfred went on to explain many of the adverse features of native life. Among these he mentioned malnutrition, poorly constructed ships, poor markets for fur and fish catches, and the comparative lack of adequate medical facilities.

The latter difficulty has in the past been one of the most serious with which Sir Wilfred and his colleagues have had to cope. He stated that it had often seemed to him unkind "to prolong a life unless we can make it worth while." However, he pointed out that the natives are by nature a very hardy race and added that he had known of only one suicide during his entire experience in Labrador.

A strong believer in the adaptability of the country and in the opportunities for new industries, Sir Wilfred stated that there is a plan under way now for the use of codfish skins as a substitute.

Following the meeting a collection was taken to be used for the benefit of the school and hospital in Cartwright.

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