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THE CRIME

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

H.A.A. VS. PEOPLE

Life in the Law School is a three-years monotony. The wretched slavey in Langdell Hall, with his green eye-shade, green book bag, and unhealthy green face has much need of comic relief. This he frequently gets from the mock arguments of the law club tournaments. The embryonic lawyer, gets all the laughs out of the arguments which he writes into his brief, no more nor less. These interclub debates are the laboratory work of the law student, and are carried on in high seriousness. A brief recently submitted by the famous Pow Wow Club, of which the following account is only the first page of ten, is studded with references to 38 bone fide cases in massive Langdell tomes.

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE POW WOW LAW CLUB

Alexander Saltoncabot

v. Wm. J. Bangham

Brief for the Plaintiff. Coram: Powell, C.J.

This is a hearing on a demurrer reserved for the opinion of the full bench of the Supreme Court of the Pow Wow on an agreed statement of facts:

The plaintiff, a graduate of Harvard College and a resident of New York, bought two tickets for the Yale game, in the section of the Harvard Stadium especially reserved for his class. Thinking later that he would be unable to use them; in reply to a request of his classmate Zilch, he said he would sell them both for $25.00, an increase of $15.00. Zilch informed the Harvard Athletic Association by telegram, as follows:

A. SALTONCABOT '04 IS SELLING YALE TICKETS FOR TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS.--P. ZILCH '04.

Plaintiff finally did go to the game, using his tickets. An usher appeared in the second period and asked for the tickets which the plaintiff gave him. The usher then asked him to leave the game, and on the plaintiff's refusal and an unsuccessful attempt by the usher to put him out, a police officer did so. Mrs. Saltoncabot followed. Outside the Stadium, but inside Soldiers Field, the head usher, Caroll Cetchell, was standing. He hissed to the plaintiff and his wife, gesturing with his thumb toward the gate.

"GWAN, SCRAM. THERE'S A NICE PLACE FOR YOUR KIND BEHIND THE BARS."

Plaintiff then left and brought this action against defendant, who is president of the Harvard Athletic Association. He seeks to recover damages from the defendant for the breach of contract involved in his ejection from the Stadium, for the assault and false imprisonment therein involved, and for the slanderous words of the head usher. The plaintiff submits that his tickets were more than a mere license, that they were at least evidence of a contract for the enjoyment of a football game, if not an actual contract, and that by preventing him from seeing the game the defendant broke his contract.

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