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HASKINS PRIZE BOOK IS AWARDED TO WERNICK

Honorable Mention to Shahan, Stewart, Ladd, Berkowitz--Given on Basis of Literary Distinction

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Robert E. Wernick '38, of Brighton, was announced yesterday as the Haskins Prize winner for the year 1934-35. The prize is awarded annually to the student enrolled in History 1 whose course essay "best combines skill in historical treatment with distinction of literary skill." Wernick's essay, written during the second half-year, was entitled "The Paris Commune."

More than 600 Freshman members of the course competed for the award, a copy of Professor Samuel E. Morison's "Founding of Harvard College". David S. Berkowitz '88, of Boston; Edward T. Ladd '38, of New Haven; Phillip T. Shahan '38, of Clayton, Missouri; and Frank H. Stewart '38, of independence, Iowa.

Professor Sidney B. Fay. Professor of History; Mr. Joseph Powers, Headmaster of Boston Latin; and Mr. G. N. Northrup, Headmaster of Roxbury Latin were the judges.

The Haskins Prize is one of two awarded annually to members of History 1, the other being the LeBaron Russell Briggs Prize, awarded last year to Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. '88, of Boston. The Briggs Prize, likewise a book, is awarded to the student with the best midyear examination essay.

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