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FROST APPOINTED TO POETRY CHAIR FOR A HALF YEAR

Distinguished Poet Has Been Member of Faculties of Amherst, Michigan, and Yale

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Robert Frost, America's distinguished poet, winner of two Pulitzer prizes, and showered with honorary degrees from all over the country, has been appointed Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry for the half year beginning this February.

Under the terms of the Norton Chair of Poetry, he will deliver publicly not less than six lectures on poetry during the spring, the dates as yet undetermined.

Frost attended Harvard from 1897 to 1899 and since has been a member of the faculties of Amherst, University of Michigan, and Yale. In 1924 and 1936 he received the Pulitzer prize for poetry, and, in 1931, the Loines prize for poetry.

Among his books of poems have been, "A Boy's Will," "North of Boston," "Mountain Interval," "New Hampshire," "West Running Brook," and "A Lone Striker".

The Charles Eliot Norton Chair of Poetry, which he will occupy, was established under a gift of $200,000 made in 1925 by Charles C. Stillman '98. The money was given in memory of Charles Eliot Norton '46, professor of the History of Art. The holder of the chair must be a man of high distinction and international reputation, under the terms of the gift.

As a farmer in Derry, N. B., Robert Frost in 1900 started his career. After five years tilling the soil, he took up teaching at Pinkerton Academy in that town, where he taught English. After a year at the State Normal School teaching Psychology, he went to Amherst College, England, where he was a professor of English, then to the University of Michigan, later to Yale, and now here.

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