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HARVARD AND THE DRIVING SURVEY

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

With the publication of the results of the Herald-Tribune national driving survey coming shortly on the heels of the Crimson poll, it is interesting to compare the sentiments of the country at large with that of the undergraduate body. In both instances uniform traffic laws among states, and stricter driving tests were warmly urged. Although the College favoured compulsory insurance, the national sentiment gave it fourth ranking--probably seeing in it another manifestation of the "tax" goblin. As was to be expected, both groups condemned marking of offender's cars, and "governors". The former bears with it the taint of Naziism, for present-day speedsters in Germany have their cars marked with a large yellow cross. The disapproval of the installation of "governors" on cars would seem an instance of the strong sporting spirit so prevalent among American motorists, whose driving creed might be "I'll take my medicine if they catch me, but they're going to have to go some to do that."

What is more important is that the universal sentiment throughout the country is for more stringent driving laws. The United States has finally realized that the huge toll of motoring deaths which result annually from speeding, carelessness and intoxication are unnecessary, and can and should be stopped. The support given by the Harvard undergraduate body to this movement is both encouraging and indicative that propaganda of such a nature throughout the college will have a decidede effect in the next few years.

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