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"CHILDREN OF RECOVERY" GOES ON EXHIBITION HERE

CANCER - PRODUCING COMPOUND PREPARED BY FIESER ON VIEW

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"Degreened" whiskey, waterproof blasting powders, weather-proof paints and dyes, and modern vitamin preparations went on display last night in the "Children of Recovery" exhibition in the Mallinckrodt Laboratory. Representative substances developed by research chemists in the year 1934-35 were exhibited. All interested persons are invited to inspect the collection, which will be displayed again tonight and tomorrow night from 7.30 until 10 o'clock.

"Children of Recovery" first appeared at the Chemical Industries Exhibit in New York City, where they so interested Arthur B. Lamb, Erving Professor of Chemistry, that he had them brought here. The present display is sponsored by the Boylston Chemical Club and the Harvard Chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma, national honorary chemical fraternity.

Samples of Whiskey

Boron chloride, a new abrasive and second only to the diamond in hardness, is on exhibit. Samples of whiskey are present which have been prematurely aged by the catalytic hydrogenation of compounds responsible for "greenness." A recent development of Grinnoll Jones, professor of Chemistry, bearing the trade name "Pamilla Cloth" is included. It is used as a wrapper for silverware--the silver hydroxide it contains prevents tarnishing.

Next to the vitamin exhibit is a collection of samples of cancer-producing compounds and their intermediates discovered and isolated by Louis F. Fleser, associate professor of Chemistry. Other supplements to the "Children of Recovery" exhibit include a diorama, showing the late Theodore W. Richards at work in his Harvard laboratory.

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