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Strictly Speaking

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Certain members of the Music Department are beginning to suspect that the monthly bell bedlam of Lowell House will weaken and crack the tower. Their suspicions, however, have so far failed to crack the calm of the House Janitor.

Nevertheless, the fact of the matter is, that the tower was not built to house the bells. Strolling toward the House Plan one day, Mr. Crane, donor of the carillon, remarked to his companion, Mr. Lowell, that this tower would be a logical location for his gift.

Measurements revealed that all of the bells could be fitted into Lowell House except the third largest, which accordingly was separated from the rest and exiled to the Baker Memorial Library at the Business School, where it now tolls the hour.

But to return to the original point, we tend to lean toward the Music Department and their suspicions--and at any rate we should certainly shudder at the thought of several dozen tons of metal shimmying overhead in their makeshift moorings.

* * *

Note to the honorable Thomas Dorgan: Mr. Harold J. Laski, famed radical and erstwhile Harvard instructor, is stopping at the home of Felix Frankfurter during his Boston visit.

* * *

Unknown to the undergraduate, groups have been at work for the last three years in an attempt to weigh down the back of his study door with brass armor plate. It's all a part of a general campaign to equip each room of the College with a complete roster of all former occupants. For example, we quote from a letter recently received by the Alumni Bulletin from a Mr. Miles L. Hanley of Madison, Wisconsin, who took a Masters degree here in 1927 and who appears to be one of the leaders of the present drive:

"....At the end of each academic year a small brass plate not more than half an inch wide should be made, bearing the name and class numerals of each occupant..., and the plates should be attached to the doors of the proper rooms.... I should like to see these plates in place by the time of the Tercentenary Celebration...."

* * *

Every so often, when least expected. Mr. Melville C. Whipple, Sanitary Inspector, descends on the Houses and collects samples of the Dining Halls' milk and cream, together with water from the Adams House swimming pool.

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