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Honored by Critics

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

IN 1925 Maxwell Anderson was on the brilliant staff of the late New York World. Anderson hadn't gone to war, but he collaborated with the World's book critic, Laurence Stallings, who had, in writing What Prince Glory, a play meant to prove that glory is gained by a bloody price in War. It was a smash hit, but not for its profanity alone.

This experience in lay writing started Maxwell Anderson, University of North Dakota, II, in a field of rich creation. Before then, he had vascillated between an academic career (school teaching in the Dakotas and the English department at Stanford) and writing for pay (newspaper work on two coasts, east and west). After What Price Glory he wrote nearly a hit a year. In 1930 it was Elizabeth the Queen, in 1933 Mary of Scotland. Both Your Houses won the Politzer prize. A month of so ago his friendly enemies, the New York critics, awarded him a plaque for having written Winter set, the best American play of 1935-36, with a friendly nod for the excellent of his Valley Forge and Night Over Taos of previous years. By writing in a loose yet strong verse, Maxwell Anderson, Stanford, M. A., preserves something of the scholarly air taste and training have led him to cherish.

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