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The History of Harvard's Commencement, Explained

PEACE ON EARTH

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The Peace Committee of the Student Union has lapsed into a dead silence which is totally unlike the exuberant exploits of the pacifists in the past. The peace-loving university can well give thanks that the day of wild strikes, riots, and arrests is over, but there is no reason for peace activity to die altogether. There is a definite place for a sensibly-managed peace society or committee in the Yard. Constructive educational work on peace problems is almost a necessity, and an independent and lively student group is the way to attain that end.

The actual situation in the Peace Committee is far from optimistic. The strength of the group has dropped off sharply within the last two or three months and the ambitious fall program had to be abandoned completely. Shortly before the Christmas vacation, however, the Committee was reorganized and the new officers have made a beginning toward outlining work for the remainder of the year.

If the Peace Committee is willing to keep within the bounds of its capabilities and manages to fight off the threat of spectacular rather than useful action, it has a chance to win the support of the entire College. Above all it should be realized that a tremendous proportion of the customary frantic "work for peace" seems extremely childish to practical men. College peace activity is confined to symposiums, speeches, and study groups; whether earnest student peace - lovers realize it or not. The Peace Committee's value lies in building an intelligent student attitude on peace--acting largely as a supplement to the formal college studies.

There are important thinkers and speakers on war, peace, neutrality, and foreign affairs whom Harvard should hear. There are vital phases of current problems which are outside the range of the regular university courses. It is the duty and opportunity of the Peace Committee to attract these men and study these subjects. If the work of the Committee is successful this year, its influence should transcend the membership lines of the Student Union, and include every interested man in the college.

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